Freestyle Swimming Techniques

Video Lectures

Displaying all 10 video lectures.
Lecture 1
How to Float in Water
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How to Float in Water

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches how to Float before learning to swim.

Video Transcript: "In this step, which is the first step for free-style, I'm going to be showing you how to do basics, which is just floating. The reason why, I'm sure a lot of you already know how to float. You do it like an airplane. You have your arms out. Your head is in. Your chin is close to your chest like this and you body is completely straight. The reason why I explain that to people when I teach them how to free-style swim is because a lot of times you'll see people bringing their heads up or moving side to side or later on when your learning how to breath you may move diagonally both ways so when really it comes down to just floating. If you guys just float there in the water right now your body will naturally move with the water. So, with free-style swim really it's just barely moving your arms and your legs and then of course you can intensify it as it goes later. The first thing you want to do is just get down to basics and just float. Just relax and see how your body naturally just floats with the water and has that buoyancy. Okay, and that's the first step for the free-style. Like I had said before; you go back to basics, so, floating on your face. We all know how to float on the face but I just want to show you how as I float my body will move. That's very important to remember because as you swim free-style a lot of people try to like fight the water. They feel like they can't move too much when really, in reality, if you just float naturally your body's going to move with buoyancy. So, here we go. So, see how I moved. So now, can you imagine with your arms and your legs it's only going to help you move a little bit further."

 

Lecture 2
How to Flutterkick for Freestyle Swimming
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How to Flutterkick for Freestyle Swimming

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches the basic freestyle flutterkick for swimmers.

Video Transcript: "Okay, on this section, which is step two of freestyle swim, now we're going to show you how to flutter kick. So your legs will basically just be like this--right, they're straight. You see a little bit of a slight bend, not much. And a flutter kick is just up and down. And up and down can be, you know, try to make as much a splash as you can, but slowly you want to kind of keep your feet under the water just barely kind of coming up. And a flutter kick is not up completely like this, or just from this part of the leg going back that way, it's the entire leg. Just a nice little flutter kick. Let me show you on the ground, outside of the water. So, what you would do is, basically, this is water right, and your feet are just up and down like that. So you see how there's that movement? Slight bend at the knees and you're just kicking up and down. And your feet are your paddles. So just, you're pushing down on the water like that. And that's flutter kicking. And that's the second step for freestyle swimming. And this, for freestyle, it's a continuation of step two, which is just your flutter kick. So, remember your legs are just up and down, up and down, up and down. So, not like this. You don't want your legs coming up to your butt. It's not a breast stroke. Just up and down like this. Just like that. And you want to practice that for awhile. You can hold onto a wall, you can hold onto stairs, whatever you choose. And just keep practicing that."

Lecture 3
How to Flutterkick Away from the Wall in Swimming
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How to Flutterkick Away from the Wall in Swimming

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches flutterkicking away from the pool wall with your head above the water.

Video Transcript: "All right, in this step--this is the third step of freestyle swimming. What you'll do is, you're still going to continue doing the flutter kick, but now what you want to do is move away from the water. Get away from the wall--so, you want to step away from the wall and then just kind of be a little bit less than halfway in the pool. Just feel comfortable where you're at, and slowly more further back as you feel a little bit more confident in your flutter kicking ability. And what you'll want to do is kind of push off the floor, and you'll go, and you'll just flutter kick, with your hands either in front of you and your head up, and you're just kicking, or you may grab any type of floating device, and just hold onto it--like a kick board, and just kick. And you really want to build on your legs first. That's one of the strongest points in freestyle swimming. So, let me show you again on the floor. So you'll have your hands either like this, right--you'll have your hands like this, or you can have them holding a floating device with your head up. So, the main thing of this is you want to be away from a wall kicking towards it. Practicing on your legs, feeling more comfortable, not being so close to the wall anymore. And that's the third step for freestyle swimming. You can practice from here to the wall, and you basically just want to have your head up out of the water for this one. Just to get used to moving around the water and feeling a little bit more confident in your swimming abilities. So you can have your other hand in front of the other, or you can hold onto a floating device, and you just--and again, you go to the other side of the wall, and kick again. And so for that you can have the other hand in front of the other one or hold onto a kick board or something."

Lecture 4
How to Flutterkick with Head in the Water
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How to Flutterkick with Head in the Water

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches flutterkicking with your head underwater, holding your breath.

Video Transcript: "In this section I'll be covering the fourth step for freestyle swimming. So, again, your legs are out, you're flutter kicking, you're away from the wall, but now we're going to increase the intensity. Instead of having your head out of the water, whether you're holding a floating device or you have the other hand on top of the other and you're kicking towards the wall. What you're going to want to do this time is be away from the wall, take a deep breath, push off, and put one hand on top of the other. Whether it's your left or your right, it doesn't matter, just as long as they look like this, and you're pointed out like this. Your elbows are more in, your shoulders--your shoulders are close to your face, your head's in the water, and remember, like floating, your chin is touching your chest. So, just like this. And then, let me show you again on the floor how it would look. So, if you want--we'll start from the legs. And you're legs are going to be kicking like this, and then we'll show the rest of the upper body. And you'll have your hand placed on top of the other, shoulders into the head, and your head is just--your nose is pointing down, your chin's kind of touching the chest. And you're just kicking towards the wall. And when you get to the wall, you'll come up for air, and you continually do that, a couple of times till you feel comfortable. And that's the fourth step for freestyle swimming. Now what you're going to do is have your hand in front of the other one, head like this, in the water this time, and flutter kick. So, here we go. And then continue going to the other side. So the reason why you do that is to basically just build the confidence in your swimming, and getting more comfortable with kicking your legs."

Lecture 5
Swimming with Hands Closed
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Swimming with Hands Closed

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches keeping the hands closed like a paddle when swimming.

Video Transcript: "In this section we're going to be covering the fifth step for freestyle swimming. So, on the fifth step, you obviously are--I showed you how to do the lower part of your body, and now we're going to be using the upper part of the body. In conjunction you're going to use both. So, to begin off, your hands, you just want to make sure there's no open hands. Never open hands when you swim. They're going to be closed hands like this, so like a paddle. Your hands are your paddles. And on this fifth step, what you want to remember is, as you're learning how to swim, you want to make sure that your hands are always closed. A lot of times people are not used to it, so you try to grab out to the water. And when you're doing that, first off, you're just hitting the water and you're not pulling anything. So, I mean you're pretty much swimming about sixty percent less than what you could be. So, with your hands closed like paddles, you're going to be grabbing onto the water, and you're going to be able to push that much more further. So, on this fifth step I'm really just teaching you the techniques of how you should have your hands, which is one of the most important things that is always continuously repeated throughout the whole entire lesson. So, your hands are the biggest things. Remember, no open hands--closed. All right, in this section we're going to show with the hands closed. So, really just your hands closed, round up moving your arms into the water, and always make sure you have your hands closed. Never any open hands. So, nothing like that, because, obviously you can see, you're not really grabbing into the water. You want to make sure that your hands are closed."

Lecture 6
How to Use the Arms in Freestyle Swimming
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How to Use the Arms in Freestyle Swimming

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches some swimming techniques for putting the arms into the water.

Video Transcript: "In this section of freestyle swim--this is the sixth step. I just finished explaining to you about the hands, having them closed, and the reason you have them closed--now I'm going to be showing you the form you'll be using. So, what you'll be doing is, you want to come out of the water, and when you place your hands into the water, you don't just slap the water. You don't ever just slap the water. You want to make sure that they come in at an angle. So, good example, this is the water, you want to come in at an angle, and then reach as far as you can--as far as your arm can go fully extended--and then you'll form an S and pull back, when you're doing freestyle swim. So, let me show you the other side. Hand closed. Always remember, hand closed. This is what's going to be pulling you towards the water. If you wonder why someone's faster than you, this is definitely one of the main reasons why. So, you bring your arm out, your elbows up. When you reach for the water don't slap. Just make sure you come in at a slightly angle, about a slight forty-five degree angle, and once you enter the water, then you're just going to completely stretch. Fully extend that arm. But, remember on your shoulders, not to be moving them side to side, so they're just straight. Always keep your shoulders straight. So you'll stretch full, stretch the other one full, and you'll pull back with each arm. So, that's the sixth step of freestyle swimming. All right, for the freestyle there's some continuation with step six. So, your hands are closed, and now--here's the water--instead of slapping the water, which is what a lot of people do, you'll see people swimming, and they'll slap the water. No, you don't want to do that. You actually want to come in at a slight angle, and you can see how my hand reaches all the way, and then pull. Slight angle--so like this. Now let me show you real quick. Watch how my hands go at a slight angle."

Lecture 7
How to Pull the Body in Freestyle Swimming
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How to Pull the Body in Freestyle Swimming

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches how to use the arms to pull the body underwater in swimming.

Video Transcript: "In this section, this is going to be seventh step of freestyle swimming. What I'll be explaining to you now is--we've learned to keep the hands closed, we've learned to them in at a forty-five degree angle. Now what I'm going to teach you is the pull. Now, what I've been taught, and what every swimmer, competitively or beginner, is always taught, is to form an S. So, the best way I'll explain is: imagine drawing a woman figure. So, your hands will go like this. A woman's figure is out like that and back in like this. But you're doing it with one arm at a time, and then the other arm. So you're doing a complete woman's figure under the water, but one arm at a time. And it's an S-form. So, here we go. You're going in at an angle; your hands are like a paddle, fully-extended. You're going to form an S under the water pulling all the way back. So did you see that? The arm enters the water, your shoulders are aligned perfectly, and you're forming and S pulling, using your entire arm as the muscle to pull back. And then the same thing with the other arm. Enter in at a forty-five degree angle, you'll extend completely, and then you're going to be forming an S to pull. And that's what's going to move you completely forward. Because if you just went like this, first off, you're going to be straining out all your muscles, and you're not getting as much of a pull. When you go like an S, it's more aerodynamic, it speeds it up quicker, and you can just get a whole lot more out of your whole entire arm just making that little S movement. And make sure that your hand's always touching your butt when you finish this section of the freestyle swim. All right, now for the freestyle. This is a continuation of step seven. So, hands closed, and I showed you not to slap the water--just go at an angle--now is the pull. So when you pull, you're going to do basically--if you had both your hands like a female shape, an S-shape. So, you're going to enter your arm in the water, and just pull all the way back. Enter in the water, pull all the way back. And make an S and pull. So, the biggest thing that I want you to remember on this one is, you want to make sure that you have a strong arm and you're not just using your forearm. I've seen a lot of people just use their forearm to pull--you've got to use your whole entire shoulder. So you go in, you pull all the way back. Same thing with this arm. Goes in, you pull all the way back. And you've got to make sure it pulls all the way, completely back. And that's what you do for pulling."

Lecture 8
Breathing Techniques in Swimming
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Breathing Techniques in Swimming

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches how to breathe properly when swimming freestyle.

Video Transcript: "In this section I'll be explaining to you your breathing techniques. And this is step eight of freestyle swimming. Breathing technique--we all have different ways of breathing, but it basically comes down to, when you breathe, the reason why I showed you in the very beginning of floating, is because that's the fundamental of when you breathe. So, when you breathe your head is straight down when you're floating, and now when you breathe you're either going to turn your head to one side and take in breathe through your mouth, and then just rotate your head evenly back into the water. And now you do the other side. You're going to rotate to one side; your chin is touching your shoulder. Not literally, but close enough. And you just want to take a deep breath. I've seen people come up like this, or like that, moving their whole shoulder. Always remember when you're swimming, especially freestyle, your shoulders never move, okay. They stay completely straight. And your whole body is aligned with what--and all you're doing is a nice, slight little turn up, right, take that breath in through your mouth, your chin should be kind of close, touching your shoulder, and then you just rotate it back in. Put your head back in, you're doing the stroke. When do you breathe you may ask? Okay, don't ever try to breathe when your arm's in front of you. Whatever sides you may breathe on, you've got make sure that you?re pulling on that side. So, if I wanted to breathe on my right side, I'll make sure that my arm is pulling, and as I'm pulling, then I'll rotate my head so I have a clear path to breathe. Because how would that look if my arm was in my face? There's no way. And that's where people start choking on the water, and then they think that they can't breathe, and take a breath while they try to swim. It's because your arm's in front of your face. So, again, on this side of the angle, we'll do it again. So, I put my hand in at a forty-five degree angle, it's fully stretched, my shoulders are straight, I'm pulling, making that S all the way back. As I'm pulling, I decide I want to breathe on this side. Take a breath; put my head back in the water. And that's how you would do step eight of freestyle swimming. In this section of freestyle, this is in continuation with step eight; it's all about your breathing. So your breathing can be, like your head's pretty much floating in the water, and watch how my head just rotates to one side, the air is in, I'll take a deep breath, put my head back in, and then do it for the same side. So watch. And that's it. That's how you would do that for the breathing. So you notice how I was just--little slight movement on each side."

Lecture 9
Breathing Counts in Swimming
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Breathing Counts in Swimming

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, teaches techniques for breathing with counts in swimming.

Video Transcript: "In this section I'm going to cover on freestyle swimming, is step nine. I just covered your breathing, which I hope you got. Remember, so the breathing again, is going to be just a nice, slight little turn. So if you took your head, and just slightly turned it just one way, breathe, put it back it, breathe. Never, ever, ever, breathe on the same side. So let me teach you something. It's called a one count, a three count, a five count, and a seven count. If you notice, all those numbers are odd. The reason why they're odd is, if you do it on an even count you're going to continuously breathe on the same side. So, what does that mean to you? You know how people will strain their necks because they're swimming, and you breathe on one side, swim, breathe on the same side, swim, breathe on the same side. Well if you notice it's an even count. So you're going one, two breathe, one, two breathe, one, two breathe. Now make it odd. One, two, three, breathe, this arm's going, one, two, three, now you're breathing on the other side. So, you always count either one, three, five, or seven in your head, whatever you feel comfortable with, because everyone's lungs work differently and you've got to build up towards it. So, most typically, you're taught to do every three strokes. Every three breaths--every three strokes you take a breath. So, let me show you. One, two, three, breathe, this arm goes, one, two, three, breathe. And if you remember, I'm breathing as I'm pulling. That's when I take my breath. Not as I'm going on three, trying to breathe, because my arm is blocking. So, it's kind of common sense, really, when you're learning how to swim. So, just remember, whichever arm you start to begin your pull that is the side that you want to breathe on. And then in your head you want to learn how to count. So, really, if you want to learn it the best, try to do it out of the water first, and count in your head. So count one, two, three, breathe, one, two, three, breathe, one, two, three, breathe. And this is something that I do outside of the water with people all the time. Then we go into the water, we try it, and if I notice that you're not able to do it, then we'll get back out of the water and do it again. Because this is definitely one of the harder things to learn if you don't know how to do it, because it's all like, you've got to count in your head. And your arms--don't ever think that because this is one, the next time it's one. They just switch. So, the way I explain this to people is, don't ever try to figure out which hand is what number. Just count in your head, and just move. So, any arm could be one, two, three. Whichever one you start off with. So, remember, it's a one, three, five, seven count for freestyle swimming. All right, in this section of freestyle--this is a continuation of step nine--and so now that you know how to breathe, you want to do it on different counts. So you'll do it on a one count, but typically you'll do it on a three count, a five count, or a seven count. So, for example, you go, one, two, three. As this, whichever arm it may be that's three, as it's moving back pulling, you want to breathe to one side. Take a breath. Then one, two, three. As that arm is moving back, you'll breathe to that side. Take a breath; put your head back in the water. Two, three, breathe on that side. So, for every three strokes, you'll end up taking a breath."

Lecture 10
Freestyle Swimming Strokes
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Freestyle Swimming Strokes

In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor, Peter Elizondo, gives an overview by putting all the freestyle swimming motions together.

Video Transcript: "In this section, this is the last and final section, so I'm kind of going to wrap everything up. So remember, on the freestyle swim I showed you how to the arms, your hands closed fingers--they're going to be like paddles, right--and your head is going to be straight. So, if you ever were to record yourself, which, if you wanted to, that would be great, or have someone just kind of record you if you wonder why, when you pick up your head, you're totally on the opposite side instead of going straight. I'll tell you what's happening. Your shoulders are moving. But if you think in your head, just keep them straight, and just move them as much as you can, stretched out but keeping your shoulders straight, then you're going to continuously go in a straight line. As well as your head. Whenever you move your head, it's literally just your head, not your shoulders. Do not move your entire body to swim. It's just your head to take a breath. So, now you're going to be in conjunction. Your legs are always flutter kicking, and then your arms are moving, and you're doing the breathing count. So it's one, two, three, breathe, one, two, three, breathe. So, one, two, three, breathe, one, two, three breathe. Okay, and then make sure that you're always kicking. You should always be kicking when you're swimming, so that you can move forward. And that's it. In this section we're basically just wrapping up freestyle. I'm glad you guys were able to tune in and pay attention to all the other steps. So, now I'm going to show you how to do the full arm movements, which I've shown you to close your hands, and to pull like an S, and to breathe every three strokes. So I'm going to show you every three strokes, and I'm going to show you my legs kicking. So here we go. And then I'm going to come back. And I hope you guys were able to learn how to do freestyle. So, remember, hands closed, you go in at an angle, you reach as forward as you can, don't ever rotate your shoulders or your body too much--just enough. And then make sure you always pull all the way back, and always keep your numbers counted three, five, or seven. And make sure you always flutter kick."