How To Swim

Video Lectures

Displaying all 25 video lectures.
Lecture 1
How to Swim the Freestyle Stroke
Play Video
How to Swim the Freestyle Stroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches the freestyle stroke, which is the fastest stroke in swimming and is a five-step process that requires practice.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to swim freestyle. Swimming provides a wonderful opportunity to exercise, play and compete with the reduce level of impact on the body. Of the four front primary strokes, freestyle is the fastest. When swimming freestyle, it's very important to keep your body aligned. To do this you're going to want to keep your focused on the bottom line of the pool, keep your head down to allow your hips to float to the top, providing for a more hydro dynamic flow through the water. This will allow you to swim more smoothly and swiftly and a lot easier. The best thing to remember, as well, is when you're taking each stroke, go ahead and let your body twist or rotate while keeping your head focused on the bottom until it's time to breath. By standard, it's best to, perhaps, to breath every three strokes otherwise known as bilateral breathing. So basically, it would be one, two, three, breath, placing your ear on your shoulder and your cheek in the water. The components of your stroke include the reach, the catch, the pull, the push, and the recovery. It's a five step process, with which, if you take time will come really naturally. Just take it slow and practice often. The last portion of your free style stroke is the kick component, which can provide a lot of power or just help balance your body as you're going through the water. By principal you're going to be using pointed toes to provide a more extended flipper, if you can look at your leg that way, and straight legs. A small fast kick is better than a large wide kick, a large wide kick really does not provide that much propulsion, a small fast kick will propel you through the water helping you to keep your hips on top and get you across to the other side a lot smoother. For more questions or information please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 2
How to Swim the Breaststroke
Play Video
How to Swim the Breaststroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to swim the breaststroke. It requires two basic components which are the kick and the pull.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to swim breaststroke. The breaststroke is basically comprised of two components, your kick, and your pull. The way I teach, I like to break down the kick first and foremost. Within that kick, we have a bend of the knees, with the base of your feet up towards the top of the water, an open of the legs, a snap, and then a glide, so it goes into your bend, open, snap, glide through the water. The glide lasting approximately two seconds. Most of the power in your kick is going to come from that snap, so if you open your legs a bit wider, you're going to have a lot more space to snap your legs together, to propel yourself through the water. The next component that I talked about, was the pull. The pull is comprised of approximately four phases. You have your outward sweep, your inward sweep towards your chest, your recovery, and your glide. The thing that I like to stress the most, is on the outward sweep. As soon as your hands come apart, lift your head for the breath, inward sweep, and then glide, putting your head down during the recovery. Pull,, breathe, bend your legs. Open, snap, recovery. Glide for two seconds. By breaking it down in those simple steps, you'll learn breaststroke in no time, and don't get down on yourself, because it does take time and practice. For more information, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 3
How to Swim the Backstroke
Play Video
How to Swim the Backstroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches that when swimming the backstroke, you must get comfortable floating on the back and then incorporate kicking and arm strokes.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to swim backstroke. Backstroke is basically the upside down version of your freestyle stroke. The only difference or the primary difference is that you're allowed to breath as often and as regular as you like, so it makes it almost more comfortable for swimmers. The first thing you're going to want to do is learn how to float on your back by simply placing your head back, your chin up in the air, putting your belly button up and just letting your body float naturally. Take breaths in nice and easy. A tendency that people have is that they stop breathing. Basically they just fill themselves up afraid to allow any water in their mouths or in their nose. But please, keep on breathing whenever you're floating on your back. The next phase is just incorporating your straight leg, pointed toe kick. You're just going to keep your hips up on top of the water with your pelvic bone up at the top and then you're just going to kick with that nice, small, fast, straight leg, pointed toe kick. Once you have your kick down, you float and you feel comfortable in the water, you can incorporate the pull or the stroke motion of the back stroke which is basically going to be a thumbs out, twisting your hand, pinkie in, bending that elbow by catching the water underwater and pushing it all the way through. So again, that's going to be a thumbs out of the water, pinkie into the water, bend that elbow under catching and pushing all the way through down to your hips. And it's going to be one hand at a time. You don't want to move both hands at the same time. It's going to be one hand at a time. Something to the effect of this. One arm pushes as the other one's coming back down your hips, the other one starts the stroke and then you can pick up the speed as fast or as slow as you like. Whatever is most comfortable. To learn more about back stroke, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 4
How to Practice Etiquette at Public Pools
Play Video
How to Practice Etiquette at Public Pools


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches the etiquette and rules for public pools. They are often posted near the pool and include not eating, drinking or peeing in the pool.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to practice pool etiquette at public pools. First, and foremost, you're going to want to take the time to notice the pool rules posted around the facility. They might be on the corner of a wall in the locker room. They might be on the outside, just at the locker room. But it will certainly break down all the rules and expectations that facility has of swimmers at that pool. Another one, that pools often request is to go ahead and shower or rinse, before entering the pool. The reason, is that you want to rinse off all the sweat, dirt, body oil, anything that you might be or, might be putting into the pool, and kind of give that oil slick look, to the swimming pools. Another one, is not really eating in pools, or drinking in pools. That would go ahead and clog the filters, if you're not careful, and you could likely choke on food or a drink, causing an incident that lifeguards would have to respond to. And safety is first and foremost when having fun. Another one, if you have longer hair, it's best to wear a swim cap, like this, in order to keep the drains, filters, unclogged. So, then you can swim your seven days a week, if you're a lap swimmer. Another one that's very important, as far as lap swimmers are concerned, is to go ahead and circle swim, if there's three or more people in the lane. And, basically that's simply swimming down on the right hand side, and swimming back to the wall on the right hand side. In other words, going down a one way road, with cars going down on both sides. If, you have two people in your lane, you can go ahead and split the lane in half, having one person on the right hand side, and one person on the left hand side. Another popular practice is at public pools, is not to rely on the lifeguards as babysitters. They're merely there to help prevent incidents, and respond to them accordingly. So, never leave your children unattended. The last one, is not going potty in the pool. While it feels natural and people just have a tendency of doing that, it's best to not to. Just for sanitary reasons, as well as sparing yourself, those embarrassing moments. To learn more about pool etiquette, please talk to your local lifeguard."

Lecture 5
How to Teach a Child to Swim
Play Video
How to Teach a Child to Swim


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child to swim. Let the child get acquainted with the water before moving to more advanced lessons on blowing bubbles.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phil and Callie, and this is how to teach a child how to swim. The first thing you want to remember when working with a child, is to remember what it was like to be a child. Only at that point can you really understand the fears that children go through in new environments, new activities, and with new people. So when you're adjusting to the water, the best way to hold a child is underneath the armpits, just like this. This will help acquaint the child with water, and make them feel more secure. Once you have them underneath the armpits, you can just kind of hold them around, keeping their body on top of the water. Do you feel comfortable? Yeah? You afraid to talk? That's okay. And then they'll just glide around on the top of the water, just like that. The next thing that I like to do working with children, is to go ahead and teach them first on how to hold their breath. And by doing this, we just ask them to go....and make big giant cheeks. Can you make your big giant cheeks? Go....and then when you count to three, go underwater. So, big giant cheeks, holding your breath, and one, two, three. How was it? (I don't know.) It was pretty good. And then they know how to hold their breath. From that point, you want to try working with bubbles, which can be a lot of fun for children, but then it also can be a little bit tough and difficult. So when you first teach 'em how to blow bubbles, it'll be something to this effect. We'll go ahead and put our mouths just at the top of the water, Miss Cal. And that way, they don't have to put their nose in the water, or their eyes, which some children might have certain fears of. Once we do that, we can do a "ring around the rosy" song, and go "splashes, splashes, we all blow bubbles". And then we'll just go with that portion, is that okay? Can we blow bubbles? (Yep) Okay, so we'll go, "splashes, splashes, we all blow bubbles." Incorporating fun activities in your teaching programs or in your lesson plan working with children, makes the experience that much more fun and engaging for children. Especially when they get a little bit cold and a little bit restless. You can also go ahead and go on with back floats, by putting their heads on your shoulder, teaching them straight leg, pointed toe kicks, and then glides. To learn more, please contact your local swim instructor for more information and tips on how to work with your child in the water."

Lecture 6
How to Swim Underwater
Play Video
How to Swim Underwater


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to swim underwater. This is a great way to move quickly in the swimming pool and expand lung capacity.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to swim underwater. Swimming underwater is a fabulous experience it provides the sensation of flying when you get the hang of it. The first thing that I'd like to encourage people to do is to go ahead and warm up by getting in the pool and swimming a few laps, just to get the heart pumping and the blood flowing. This will help your body acclimate to the temperature and the rigors of swimming in general. Once you've become comfortable in the water, go ahead and return to the wall, and you go ahead and take a couple of breaths, nice deep breaths, hold it, slowly let it out, kind of exercise those lungs a bit stretch them out. Once you feel nice and comfortable, after you've brought your heart rate back down, go ahead and take a giant breath, inhale, hold it, use the side of the pool as leverage, push yourself down about two to three feet and then you can push off across the pool. You can utilize a pull or a breast stroke pull followed by a giant frog kick into a streamline, and just as you feel like you're about to slow down after the kick, go ahead and do a giant breast stroke, pull, and followed by a frog kick into your glide. This will conserve energy and get you across the pool quite fast. A couple of things you want to remember though when doing underwater swims is that safety is first and foremost. If at any point you feel like your lungs are about to pop, or you do need a breath, please surface, please break the surface of the water, take that breath, and then you can resume your underwater swim. This is really important because you can pass out when going under a hypoxic situation."

Lecture 7
How to Flip-Turn When Swimming Freestyle
Play Video
How to Flip-Turn When Swimming Freestyle


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to do a flip-turn when swimming freestyle. This is the fastest and quickest way to get off the wall when swimming laps.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do a freestyle flip turn in the water. As you're swimming into a wall, the quickest and most efficient way to get off that wall, is by performing a flip turn. The way that I look at it, is as you're coming into the wall. When you're about a half a body length away, or even an arm's length away, you're going to want to go ahead and tuck your forehead, down into your belly button, while simultaneously bringing your knees, bringing your knees up into your forehead. You're going to curl up into a tiny little ball, flip over onto your back, just like a somersault. Plant your feet on the wall, and spring off like a rocket. You'll be springing off onto your back. As you push off that wall, you're going to twist onto your stomach, in a streamline fashion. Start your flutter kick, or dolphin kick, and as soon as you break the surface, start your stroke, and go back into your freestyle. Another way to look at this, is as you're swimming into the wall, there will be T's at the bottom of the pool, which are approximately one stroke, one full stroke away from the wall. You'll take that last stroke, and immediately flip into your turn, and again, don't push off until your feet are firmly planted on the wall. What some people tend to do, is they'll flip, their feet won't be on the wall, and then they'll kick the wall with all their might, damaging their heels, and causing their body quite a shock, so plant your feet firmly on the wall. Spring off, with your hands up top, in a streamlined fashion, twist on your stomach, and kick away into your stroke. For more questions on flip turns, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 8
How to Flip-Turn When Swimming the Backstroke
Play Video
How to Flip-Turn When Swimming the Backstroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to flip-turn when swimming the Backstroke. You must keep an eye out for backstroke flags to indicate when to turn over and flip to the other direction.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do the flip turn while doing your backstroke. The preparation of the backstroke begins once you see the backstroke flags hanging approximately five yards from the wall. The reason why they're there is to go ahead and indicate that the wall is coming up, to spare you any sort of injury to your head and your fingers. People have jammed their fingers plenty on those walls, and have bumped their heads. So once you see those flags, you're going to, you're going to go ahead and work with the approximate five strokes from the wall, and on that fifth stroke, you're going to go ahead and rotate onto your belly, pull one freestyle pull into your somersault or your freestyle flip turn, plant those feet; like we talked about before, push off in a streamline fashion, and stay on your back. Give yourself a couple dolphin kicks to propel you through the water, and after about the third dolphin kick, surface and go right back into your thumb out, pinkie in, bend that elbow, and push. For more questions on backstroke and backstroke flip turns, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 9
How to Swim the Butterfly Stroke
Play Video
How to Swim the Butterfly Stroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to swim the Butterfly Stroke. This is one of the most rhythmic swimming strokes and can be broken down into the kick and the stroke with the arms.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to swim the butterfly stroke. Power, fluidity ,and rhythm make butterfly one of the most admired and most respected strokes in the pool. To start, we're going to go ahead and break down the butterfly into two components, the kick and then the stroke with the arms. To start with, with your legs you're going to go ahead and put them together making a giant fishtail approximately like this, these being your feet, you're going to go ahead and cause a wave like motion or a kick from your hips down to your knees down through your feet. Otherwise known as the Dolphin kick. The next part is the pool, the pool is going to be comprised of three primary components. It's going to be starting off with your arms, shoulder with the part out in front or up at the top, your pull which is down to approximately your waist, your push, all the way down to your hips, arm and thigh, and then you'll recovery over the top of the water, and again, your recovery is going to come up to the top point which will be shoulders with a part to keep your arms in line with your shoulders. Putting these two together can be difficult and takes a little bit of time unless you're familiar with the two kick cycle. Basically, what's going to happen, is you're going to go ahead and push off the wall starting with your dolphin kick through the water, whenever, you're ready to breath, go ahead and do a giant pull push lifting your head taking that breath, and as you're pulling and pushing, you're going to do a giant kick to help get you up out of the water, then as you get that breath and you're in recovery, you're going to kick back down into the water and into your glide for about one or two seconds. So, to learn more about butterfly please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 10
How to Do an Eggbeater Kick
Play Video
How to Do an Eggbeater Kick


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to do an Eggbeater Kick. It is mainly used in treading water for water polo and requires the legs to move in opposite directions.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do the eggbeater kick. The eggbeater kick is one of the most involved forms of treading water. It's primarily used in water polo, but it can also be used in other forms, such as waterfronts, open waterfronts when you're helping, as far as being a lifeguard is concerned, and just treading water in general, for safety or exercise. The eggbeater is basically just that. It's an eggbeater type fashion with your legs. The best way to start, is to go ahead and find yourself a standard dining room chair. It's at 90 degrees. Go ahead and sit on the edge of it, with your legs hanging over, also bent at a 90 degree angle, and just go ahead and start moving with your right leg. Just move it in a circular fashion, counterclockwise, and then once you become comfortable with that, use your other leg, your left leg, and go in a clockwise position. Just do one leg at a time until you're comfortable with moving your legs in a circular fashion. Once you think that you're comfortable in making a full circle with each leg, in that upright sitting posture, go ahead and start your right leg, and right as your right leg is coming out, have your left leg go in, so at all times, there's going to be a leg going in, and another leg going out, so if these are my legs, they would be like this. In, out, in, out, in, out. Another way to practice this, once you become comfortable sitting in a chair and doing it, is to go ahead and sit on the side of the pool, so you can kind of feel the resistance of the water. Then from there, you can slide into the pool, move those legs, and then as you become more comfortable, you can raise one arm at a time, treading water with the other, and then eventually you'll be able to tread water, just using your legs in the eggbeater kick, with both hands up out of the water. To learn more, contact your local water polo expert."

Lecture 11
How to Swim Head-High Freestyle
Play Video
How to Swim Head-High Freestyle


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to swim Head-High Freestyle. It is good for swimmers who want to be able to see at all times and breathe freely.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to swim heads up freestyle. The heads up freestyle stroke is a wonderful stroke for those that want to breathe as often as they like by keeping their head above the water, those who are playing water polo, so they can have a visual of everything that's going on during the game, and also for lifesaving. So then, if you're swimming out to a victim in, or a person in distress, you can keep your eyes on them the whole time. In the heads up freestyle, you're going to be using a lot of lower body strength to try to keep that whole body up on top of the water and propel yourself forward. So you'll be using a nice strong, like otter paw; flat hands, a nice strong follow-through stroke with high elbows. So the stroke's going to look a little bit like this. But obviously you'll be using a lot more legs to help keep your hips up to kind of maintain that hydrodynamic flow through the water. To learn more about heads up freestyle please visit your local water polo coach or swim expert."

Lecture 12
How to Swim the Sidestroke
Play Video
How to Swim the Sidestroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to swim the sidestroke. This is a good stroke to learn when swimming in order to keep the head above water and help with rescue swimming.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do the sidestroke. The sidestroke is a wonderful stroke for those who want to swim through the water with ease, and keep their head up the whole time. It's also an excellent stroke for lifesaving skills if towing someone in a cross-chest carry through the water. You'll be able to place the person on your hips, and keep their head above water; resting on your shoulder. Now, to do the sidestroke what you're going to be using is a scissor kick, where you'll have your low lower hip towards the bottom of the pool, and you'll have your other hip up towards the top. It'll just be a scissor motion like so, so you'll bring your legs up and slice through the water. The other aspect of it is the arm motion, which a lot of people kind of get messed up. But if you think about it as picking an apple out of a tree, putting it into your other hand, and putting it into a basket as you're doing your kick it'll come quite naturally. If you watch videos you'll notice people just gliding through the water. What they'll be doing is keeping their heads looking towards their hips so they can kind of maintain their balance through the water. To learn more about sidestroke please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 13
How to Swim the Trudgen Stroke
Play Video
How to Swim the Trudgen Stroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to swim the Trudgen Stroke. Combine the sidestroke and freestyle swimming with scissor kicks.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do the trudgen stroke. Now, the trudgen stroke is a wonderful stroke, that you can use to help develop your upper body and lower body, utilizing two different types of stroke. One being the side stroke, and the other being the free style. From the side stroke, you can go ahead and take the scissor kick, where you're going to be bringing your legs back, and snapping them together. And of course, being on your side, as you do this. The next thing you're going to do, is, you're going to be using your freestyle arms. Which will kind of provide a little bit of a twist. Where your arms will be wanna, want to be this way, flat on the water, and your hips will want to be straight up and down, with your left or your right, facing the bottom. So, you'll be using a nice, smooth, freestyle stroke with high elbows to keep your head out of the water. And then utilizing your side stroke, side kick to prepare yourself, propel yourself. So, basically, it'll be a pushing of the water back, side kick, pushing the water back, side kick, and your kick will happen on whichever side your strong arm is. So, if your right arm's strong, you'll probably want to open your legs up, prepare 'em for the sidekick, and, snap 'em together as your arm is coming back or doing the recovery position. To learn more about the trudgen stroke, please go on line or contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 14
How to Turn While Swimming the Breaststroke
Play Video
How to Turn While Swimming the Breaststroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to turn while swimming the Breaststroke. Glide to the wall and then draw the legs under and push off the wall.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do a turn while doing breaststroke. The breaststroke is a very easy stroke as far as that full breathe, kick, glide aspect that we were talking about before. As you're coming into the wall however, you're going to want to do your outward, your inward sweep, glide into the wall with your fingertips; touching the wall and/or grabbing the edge of the pool, drawing your legs underneath you with your top hips; foot on top, and your left leg or lower leg on the bottom on on your side. And then you're going to simultaneously go under the water; push off into a streamline manner. So once again, you're going to be doing that one last pull up, glide into the wall, touch with both fingers, draw your legs underneath you as quickly and smoothly as possible. And then, instantaneously duck down at the same time, and push off onto your stomach in a streamline fashion in getting ready for your pull downs. For more questions about open turns or breaststroke turns, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 15
How to Survival Float
Play Video
How to Survival Float


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to Survival Float. This requires swimmers to float on their stomach with the face in the water to conserve energy.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to do the survival float. As the name suggest the survival float is one that's going to be used if you ever find yourself in a situation where you're too tired to swim, if you've fallen off a boat, or you just need to hold on a little bit longer on top of the water until someone can rescue you. Now to do the survival float you're going to go ahead and place yourself flat on the water and you're going to be putting your face in the water, which sounds awkward but is necessary just to keep your body totally relaxed as you're waiting for help, or waiting for someone to come and get you. Basically, what you're going to do is you're going to go ahead and just relax by taking a deep breath, placing yourself in the water, letting your legs float straight down beneath you, and your body will naturally float on top. What this is going to do is, it's going to help you keep absolutely relaxed and preserve all the energy you need in order to get up, bring your head up, take a breath and then put your face down in the water to relax. To learn more about the survival float please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 16
How to Teach a Child to Float in the Water
Play Video
How to Teach a Child to Float in the Water


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child to float in the water. This can be scary for most children, but working in slow steps will get children used to being in the water.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to teach your child how to float. In the basic of introduction of children to water, many children have certain types of fears as far as putting their face in the water, not being able to touch the bottom. So, doing floats is a very sensitive area. You really want to communicate to the child everything that's going on as far as where you're going to support them, as far as their head, their lower neck, their back, their legs and so on. The first place I'd like to start is on the steps, and I use that a lot because it's the best place and the safest place, it seems, for children to become comfortable or acquainted with any particular type of swimming technique, skill or floating. So, go ahead and have them lay on a step, preferably, the first step where there's about two to three inches of water, so they get that sensation of the water being around their cheeks and over their ears, but their head's supported by the step. Once they become most comfortable with that, go ahead and have them float with just their legs hanging off of the step and their shoulders and head will be supported by the step, then as they become comfortable with that, you can put their head on your shoulder, holding their lower back and then slowly, but eventually, being able to bring them off of your shoulder and floating into the water, where then, at some point, you can go ahead and move your lower hand, or your hand from their lower back, support their head and then I often like to use, either their ears, because their body will be naturally floating, or using the bridge of their goggles to help keep their head up, and continue to remind them to push their belly button up towards the sky and keep their head back in order to keep comfortable in a proper position on top of the water. To learn more about teaching a child how to float, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 17
How to Teach a Child the Back Float
Play Video
How to Teach a Child the Back Float


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child the back float, starting by using the steps of the pool to get the child comfortable in a safe place.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to teach a child back float. This is my friend Kyle. (Hi) We gotta go like this, go Hi! (Hi!) All right. The first thing you want to do when working with a child in back float, is to really check to see how comfortable they are in the water. The place that I'd like to start when doing back floats with children Kyle's age and a little bit younger, is to go ahead and use the steps. Preferably the first step, where the water is about two to three inches deep, so then they're secure at all times, and they can feel their heads being supported by the stair below them. So what we like to ask them to do is, we like to ask them to put their head back, looking up at the sky. You can entertain them with bumblebees, birds, airplanes. Look for shooting stars during the middle of the day, and just kind of staying comfortable. Supporting their head with your shoulder, and then asking them also to put their belly button up in the sky. Once they become more comfortable with that, you can slowly move them off your shoulder, but continue to support them with the hand, your left hand. And as you can see, Kyle's chin is a little bit forward, so we're going to ask him to put his head back a little bit more, and a little bit more than that. Can you put your head back more, please? There we go. So now he's in a really good position. I'm also supporting his lower back right now to help him feel secure. What you can also do in order to help children stay secure, is put their feet on some lane lines, just kind of put it there, or even put it in one of the little filter wells, or on a stair. So then he's supporting his own body. I can remove my hand from his lower back, and then I can come up here and focus more on his head. Then what you can do is, once he's comfortable, are you feeling comfortable sir? (Yep) You feelin' okay? Are you sure? (Yeah!) Awesome! Then you can go ahead and let him know, and always communicate with the child what you're going to do next, let him know that you're going to go ahead and ask him to put his head back, and that you're going to remove your hand from his lower head, or the lower neck. Is it okay if I remove my hand from back here? (Yep) Okay, we're going to let you float for five seconds, okay? And I want you to try to float for five seconds. You ready? You can also use the bridge of their goggles if they're properly secured, and then just let 'em float. For one, two, three, four, five. Are you doin' okay. (Yep) Okay. Once they become comfortable with that, then you can kind of move away from the body a little bit, pull your chest away. And would you be okay just floating on your back here like this? Awesome. So we're going to let him float for five more seconds, so he gets a...a finer sense of security in supporting himself on his back. You ready? And here we go, just breathe nice and easy, and keep that head back, all the way back. There we go. For one, two, three....keep your head back. Head back, head back, put that head back, sir, head all the way back! One, two, three, four, five! Thank you sir. And that is your back float for children. One more tool that I like to use is the noodle. And a fine little trick with this is to ask the child to put their head back, all the way back on the noodle. He keeps his head back, and what I'm going to do us use the current of my body to help pull him across the pool, and he'll be floating by himself. To learn more about teaching a child to back float, please contact your local swim instructor."

Lecture 18
How to Teach a Child to Kick in the Water
Play Video
How to Teach a Child to Kick in the Water


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child to kick in the water. This requires the child to learn how to point their toes and keep their legs straight.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi this is Phillip Toriello and this is how to teach a child how to kick. The best way to work with a child and the kicking process is to go ahead and work with ballerina toes or soldier toes or diver Dan kind of toes. So the first thing that I like to do is go ahead and have the child, can you show me your pointed toes Nams? Ballerina toes? Very nice. Keep the toes nice and pointing. If you associate it with a ballerina or diver Dan or something to that effect they'll be more likely to understand and get the concept down. The next thing we like to do is to go ahead and ask them to keep their legs absolutely straight. Not bended knees but straight legs. The process that I use for this is the red light, yellow light, green light. Red light means stop, yellow light meaning nice straight legs, pointed toes, don't bend your knees. Exactly. And then the green light means super fast straight legs and pointed toes. The best place to start for the child is by using the steps. They can hold on to the steps, keep their heads above water. Other tools would include noodles such as this. And we'll just put Callie on the noodle. Can you hold onto the noodle please? On top of the noodle? Hold on top of it. And show us your straight leg pointed toe kicks with face in the water. And go. Good job. Nice. And then can you kick back to us? Hold on to the noodle and kick back towards the wall okay? Go fast. Go. And then as they advance they can go ahead and use kick boards. I simply use the noodles to kind of incorporate color and a more fun soft utensil to help the child. To learn more please talk to your local swim instructing expert."

Lecture 19
How to Teach a Child Rhythmic Breathing in the Water
Play Video
How to Teach a Child Rhythmic Breathing in the Water


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child rhythmic breathing in the water.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to teach a child rhythmic breathing. After you've worked with a child in teaching them how to use straight legs and pointed toes, basic pop-up breaths, and their big arms as far as the reach, catch, pull, push, it's now time to start focusing on rhythmic breathing. The best way to start is go ahead and utilize the staircase, where you can put the child's hands on the stair on the first step, and they can simply put their face in the water, blowing their bubbles out, and then taking a breath every three strokes. Generally, the way I work is that if a child knows how to count to three then you can teach them the basics of one, two, three, turn their head to the side, put their ear on their shoulder and their cheek in the water to take that side breath. As they become more comfortable doing that on the step, then you can basically hold onto their feet; putting them just underneath your armpit, and locking their feet; keeping their feet afloat, and then they can work on it going across the pool. This provides a child a finer sense of balance and coordination through the water, and actually doing the rhythmic breathing on their own. So the basic principle is one, two, three, turn your head to the left, and then one, two, three, turn your head to the right to learn that basic principle of rhythmic breathing. Then, as the child becomes more comfortable, you can have them hold onto a noodle; using their arms one at a time, which will really help reiterate that reach concept, and then they can kind of just take the time with pushing the water back, reaching for the sky, and also implementing that kick at the same time. To learn more about rhythmic breathing and working with children, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 20
How to Teach a Child the Crawl Stroke
Play Video
How to Teach a Child the Crawl Stroke


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child the Crawl Stroke. Try to get the child to push the water all the way back to their legs.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Philip Toriello, and this is how to teach big arms or a crawl stroke to a child. The first thing you want to remember is that big arms is kind of a coordination factor, trying to get those arms to push the water all the way back and then reach for the sky can be an awful lot. So, the best way to start is to go ahead and work with the child on the steps by having them hold on to the steps, pushing the water back, keeping their head above water, just so they can get used to the arms, let them practice it, show it to them, and then what you can do is you can go ahead and get the child, and go ahead and help them with their hands through the water and reaching all the way for the sky. This way their getting a visual, an audio and a personal experience of what big arms or crawl stroke is supposed to feel like. For example, we're going to use Kyle right now, and we're going to use the noodles that I've talked about before. Those colorful soft objects that children tend to gravitate towards and we're just going to have him put his face in the water, and he's going to be working on pushing the water all the way back, down to his mid thigh. So, we want to push it all the way back down to our thigh, right. yep. And then he's going to reach all the way for the sky. Another good point to remember, is to teach him how to use their otter paws, as I call them, which means keeping their fingertips all together at the same time. Some children often like to keep their fingers like this which lets the water go through and it kind of develops a bad habit as they get older. So, remind your children to use otter paws whenever they're doing their big arms. Ready to go, sir. Yeah. Alright, so, you're going to put your face in the water, we're going to go ahead and try to breathe; you've got to breathe how many strokes? Three. Three strokes and you're just going to push the water all the way back and reach for the sky. Possum, Possum; you're ready to go. And go. Big arms. Good job. Keep going. Brilliant, sir. Brilliant. And you can also use your knee to help balance a child, holding them in one place, with their otter paws and just work with their hands so they get that feeling of where their arms are supposed to go and what they're supposed to do; pushing the water back, reaching for the sky, pushing the water back and reaching for the sky. As the child become more advanced and more comfortable with this stroke, you can have them go ahead and push off doing, push off with glides from the stairs, practicing their big arms and then incorporating pop-up breaths or arrhythmic breathing at the same time. To learn more, please contact your local swim instructor."

Lecture 21
How to Teach a Child to Dive
Play Video
How to Teach a Child to Dive


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child to dive.



Video Transcript:
PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Torielle, and this is how to teach a child on how to dive. The first thing you want to remember is that children, innately, especially when they're younger, kind of have certain fears as far as the depth of the water is concerned. So, it's really best to adjust them by having them just jump into the water first. Jump onto noodles, jump into your hands, or even holding their hand as they jump into the water. Once they've acclimated to the jumping process of actually jumping into the water, and overcome the fears of getting their head wet, you can go ahead and ask them to start doing what we call a knee dive. I'm going to ask Callie to go ahead and pull herself up please. And we'll have Callie to ahead and get into the knee dive position. Can you get into the knee dive position by me? Thank you, now, so bring your toes close, the thing that I'd like you to notice is that we have her toes beneath her foot, we have her foot on the edge of the pool, and that Callie is hugging her ears as tightly as she can with her arms. And most importantly, keeping her head down and looking at her, What are you looking at Callee? Belly button. So, what we're going to do, to help support her is we're going to help her lean forward as much as she can attempting to, trying to touch the water with the tips of her fingers, cause we want to have the fingers go into the water first. As you can see I'm supporting her belly button, right here, just to help her as she slides into the water. How was it? It was the best. Can we do one more? How was it? Awesome. Once again, the most important thing to remember is to support the child either by holding the belly or their fingertips. Especially in working in smaller pools with, like a depth of like three and a half or a little bit higher. Hold onto their hands so you can guide them through the water to make sure that they don't hit their head. As a general rule, you don't really want to be diving in anything less than eight feet, but when working with children in smaller warmer pools, you just have to kind of work around that and make sure that you're looking out for their safety. To learn more about working with children and diving into pools contact your local swimming instructor."

Lecture 22
How to Teach a Child to Tread Water
Play Video
How to Teach a Child to Tread Water


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to teach a child to tread water.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi this is Phillip Toriello and this is how to teach a child how to tread water. Basically I start children off by doing a basic head float. By putting their heads back and just kind of letting their belly buttons float beneath them. Or just kind of sink down beneath them. The legs tend to be the hardest part to keep bodies afloat so we just have them put their head back and then they can use their arms in a sculling fashion back and forth. While this is a bit tough to pick up on at first it's good to start using or start a child out by using a noodle underneath their arms and or underneath their legs so that they can just get the basic principle of that back and forth arm motion. Then they can slowly put their head back and then start doing their float or treading water just like this. As the child becomes more comfortable you can move them on or introduce them to egg beating or using their legs in that egg beater fashion while moving their arms back and forth or what we call sculling water. That back and forth motion with the hands? Then also utilizing that egg beater motion. To learn more about treading water and working with children please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 23
How to Prevent Swimmer's Ear
Play Video
How to Prevent Swimmer's Ear


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to prevent swimmer's ear. One of the best ways to prevent this is to wear earplugs when swimming.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to prevent swimmer's ear. The best way to prevent swimmer's ear, is to not go swimming at all. But if you should decide to, say to swim laps, surf, or any other type of aquatic activities, the best thing to do is to wear earplugs. Now, these range from many different styles, including silicone types, that fit into your ears like putty, to those that have a plastic stem, and little rings that pop into your ear, like a cork. Those I think, are the best kind, as far as not falling out of your ears, and keeping the water absolutely out. Following every swim, there are certain solutions you can also buy at drugstores, that are made up of an alcohol, hydrogen peroxide combination, that will help dry out the ear canal, after swimming,and of course, there's the ever infamous pinky, that you can use as a plunger, and kind of use gravity to help you out, to dump the water out of your ear. To learn more about preventing swimmer's ear, please contact your local swimming expert, your physician, or go online to find out more."

Lecture 24
How to Improve Your Breaststroke Kick
Play Video
How to Improve Your Breaststroke Kick


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches a good way to improve your breaststroke kick by practicing with a kick board.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to improve your breast stroke kick. You know, as we've talked about before, the breast stroke kick is comprised of bending the legs, opening the legs, snapping them together, and gliding. The power primarily coming from that open, and then the snapping portion, which causes that forward momentum. The best way to start is to grab a kick board. This will help keep your upper body supported up on top of the water, while being able to isolate and focus on your legs, as far as that bend, open, snap motion of your legs. So just by holding the kick board up at the top, you're just going to let your body or hips float up to the top behind you, and just continue on with your kick. Try a couple lengths of this using the board, and once you become comfortable, go ahead and hold the base of the board, hold the bottom of the board, with your face looking straight down at the bottom of the pool to really support that prone position on top of the water, and then also enable you to have a little more hydrodynamic flow through the water. Once you become quite comfortable with that, and you feel like you can do it without the kick board, simply by using a streamline position with your hands out in front, go ahead and push off the wall and do a couple lengths, arms out in front. Try two kicks, and raise your head with a pop up breath to keep yourself going. To learn more about improving your breast stroke kick, please contact your local swimming expert."

Lecture 25
How to Breathe While Swimming Freestyle
Play Video
How to Breathe While Swimming Freestyle


In this video lesson, Swimming Instructor Phillip Toriello teaches how to breathe while swimming Freestyle. Breathe using the side breath which allows a swimmer to put the ear to the shoulder, the cheek in the water and the mouth comes to the surface for a breath.



Video Transcript: PHILLIP TORIELLO: "Hi, this is Phillip Toriello, and this is how to breathe, while swimming freestyle. The best way to breathe while swimming freestyle, is to utilize the side breath technique, which allows you to put your ear on your shoulder, and your cheek in the water, with your lips just above the water's surface, to get that breath of air in. The best way to start out, is to go ahead and go to a set of stairs, just so you can become more comfortable with the process. Put your face in the water, and practice a couple of strokes. Blow your bubbles into the water, and take a breath, whenever you feel necessary. Now, there's different ways of doing those side breaths, as far as the routines, or the repetition of it. Some people like to breathe every stroke. Others like to breathe every two strokes, and then most people tend to gravitate, towards breathing every three strokes, when they're in to serious lap swimming, or even competitive style swimming. If you feel good with that, after using the steps, go ahead and gravitate towards a kick board, and just hold onto the kick board, the bottom of it, and just work on pushing the water back, blowing your bubbles out, and taking a side breath, whenever you feel most comfortable. To learn more about side breathing, please contact your local swimming expert."