Introduction to EECS II: Digital Communication Systems

Course Description

An introduction to several fundamental ideas in electrical engineering and computer science, using digital communication systems as the vehicle. The three parts of the course—bits, signals, and packets—cover three corresponding layers of abstraction that form the basis of communication systems like the Internet.

The course, taught by Prof. George Verghese, teaches ideas that are useful in other parts of EECS: abstraction, probabilistic analysis, superposition, time and frequency-domain representations, system design principles and trade-offs, and centralized and distributed algorithms. The course emphasizes connections between theoretical concepts and practice using programming tasks and some experiments with real-world communication channels.

Copyright Information

Hari Balakrishnan, and George Verghese. 6.02 Introduction to EECS II: Digital Communication Systems, Fall 2012. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed 2 Mar, 2015). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
Introduction to EECS II: Digital Communication Systems
Phoning home using a K=15, rate=1/6 convolutional code. See Lecture 6 for more information. (Image in the public domain. Source: NASA.)
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Video Lectures & Study Materials

Visit the official course website for more study materials: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-02-introduction-to-eecs-ii-digital-communication-systems-fall-2012/

# Lecture Play Lecture Notes & Slides
1 Overview: Information and Entropy (49:09) Play Video Lecture Slides
2 Compression: Huffman and LZW (49:53) Play Video Lecture Slides
3 Errors, channel codes (51:09) Play Video Lecture Slides
4 Linear block codes, parity relations (50:00) Play Video Lecture Slides
5 Error correction, syndrome decoding (48:55) Play Video Lecture Slides
6 Convolutional codes (49:24) Play Video Lecture Slides
7 Viterbi decoding (49:23) Play Video Lecture Slides
8 Noise (50:36) Play Video Lecture Slides
9 Transmitting on a physical channel (48:44) Play Video Lecture Slides
10 Linear time-invariant (LTI) systems (50:30) Play Video Lecture Slides
11 LTI channel and intersymbol interference (48:16) Play Video Lecture Slides
12 Filters and composition (51:04) Play Video Lecture Slides
13 Frequency response of LTI systems (49:40) Play Video Lecture Slides
14 Spectral representation of signals (49:14) Play Video Lecture Slides
15 Modulation/demodulation (52:03) Play Video Lecture Slides
16 More on modulation/demodulation (47:43) Play Video Lecture Slides
17 Packet switching (50:09) Play Video Lecture Slides
18 MAC protocols (53:39) Play Video Lecture Slides
19 Network routing (without failures) (42:57) Play Video Lecture Slides
20 Network routing (with failures) (51:08) Play Video Lecture Slides
21 Reliable transport (50:09) Play Video Lecture Slides
22 Sliding window analysis, Little's law (53:26) Play Video Lecture Slides
23 A brief history of the Internet (51:16) Play Video Lecture Slides
24 History of the Internet cont'd, course summary (51:11) Play Video Lecture Slides

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