Introduction to Political Philosophy

Course Description

This course is intended as an introduction to political philosophy as seen through an examination of some of the major texts and thinkers of the Western political tradition. Three broad themes that are central to understanding political life are focused upon: the polis experience (Plato, Aristotle), the sovereign state (Machiavelli, Hobbes), constitutional government (Locke), and democracy (Rousseau, Tocqueville). The way in which different political philosophies have given expression to various forms of political institutions and our ways of life are examined throughout the course.

Copyright Information

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Introduction to Political Philosophy
Introduction to Political Philosophy with Professor Steven B. Smith
4 ratings

Video Lectures & Study Materials

# Lecture Play Lecture
1 Introduction: What is Political Philosophy? (37:06) Play Video
2 Socratic Citizenship: Plato, Apology (45:35) Play Video
3 Socratic Citizenship: Plato, Crito (47:16) Play Video
4 Philosophers and Kings: Plato, Republic, I-II (47:15) Play Video
5 Philosophers and Kings: Plato, Republic, III-IV (47:18) Play Video
6 Philosophers and Kings: Plato, Republic, V (45:09) Play Video
7 The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle, Politics, I, III (43:46) Play Video
8 The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle, Politics, IV (47:59) Play Video
9 The Mixed Regime and the Rule of Law: Aristotle, Politics, VII (46:13) Play Video
10 New Modes and Orders: Machiavelli, The Prince (chaps. 1-12) (37:21) Play Video
11 New Modes and Orders: Machiavelli, The Prince (chaps. 13-26) (43:29) Play Video
12 The Sovereign State: Hobbes, Leviathan (45:29) Play Video
13 The Sovereign State: Hobbes, Leviathan (46:24) Play Video
14 The Sovereign State: Hobbes, Leviathan (44:24) Play Video
15 Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (1-5) (44:41) Play Video
16 Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (7-12) (45:12) Play Video
17 Constitutional Government: Locke, Second Treatise (13-19) (45:12) Play Video
18 Democracy and Participation: Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality (author's preface, part I) (45:53) Play Video
19 Democracy and Participation: Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality (part II) (41:36) Play Video
20 Democracy and Participation: Rousseau, Social Contract, I-II (40:39) Play Video
21 Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville, Democracy in America (42:05) Play Video
22 Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville, Democracy in America (38:13) Play Video
23 Democratic Statecraft: Tocqueville, Democracy in America (50:34) Play Video
24 In Defense of Politics (39:02) Play Video

Comments

Displaying 2 comments:

thbyrnes wrote 8 years ago.
I hardly believe that everyone looking upon wreckage on the
highway is looking for the blood or gore... or whatever
other depravation the professor claims.

I know that when I look, I am hoping to see that no one is
hurt or if my help is required…

Assuming the dark-side of man seems quite prevalent in the
teachers of the elite.


thbyrnes wrote 8 years ago.
I hardly believe that everyone looking upon wreckage on the
highway is looking for the blood or gore... or whatever
other depravation the professor claims.

I know that when I look, I am hoping to see that no one is
hurt or if my help is required…

Assuming the dark-side of man seems quite prevalent in the
teachers of the elite.


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