Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior

Course Description


In this course, Stephen C. Stearns gives 36 video lectures on Evolution, Ecology and Behavior. This course presents the principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior for students beginning their study of biology and of the environment. It discusses major ideas and results in a manner accessible to all Yale College undergraduates. Recent advances have energized these fields with results that have implications well beyond their boundaries: ideas, mechanisms, and processes that should form part of the toolkit of all biologists and educated citizens.



Course Structure:

This Yale College course, taught on campus three times per week for 50 minutes, was recorded for Open Yale Courses in Spring 2009.

Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior


About Professor Stephen C. Stearns

Stephen C. Stearns is the Edward P. Bass Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and specializes in life history evolution and evolutionary medicine. He was educated at Yale, the University of Wisconsin, and the University of British Columbia. His books include Evolution, an Introduction; Watching from the Edge of Extinction; and The Evolution of Life Histories, and he is the editor of Evolution in Health and Disease and The Evolution of Sex and Its Consequences. He founded and has served as president of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology and the Tropical Biology Association.

6 ratings

Video Lectures & Study Materials

# Lecture Play Lecture
1 The Nature of Evolution: Selection, Inheritance, and History Play Video
2 Basic Transmission Genetics Play Video
3 Adaptive Evolution: Natural Selection Play Video
4 Neutral Evolution: Genetic Drift Play Video
5 How Selection Changes the Genetic Composition of Population Play Video
6 The Origin and Maintenance of Genetic Variation Play Video
7 The Importance of Development in Evolution Play Video
8 The Expression of Variation: Reaction Norms Play Video
9 The Evolution of Sex Play Video
10 Genomic Conflict Play Video
11 Life History Evolution Play Video
12 Sex Allocation Play Video
13 Sexual Selection Play Video
14 Species and Speciation Play Video
15 Phylogeny and Systematics Play Video
16 Comparative Methods: Trees, Maps, and Traits Play Video
17 Key Events in Evolution Play Video
18 Major Events in the Geological Theatre Play Video
19 The Fossil Record and Life's History Play Video
20 Coevolution Play Video
21 Evolutionary Medicine Play Video
22 22. The Impact of Evolutionary Thought on the Social Sciences Play Video
23 The Logic of Science Play Video
24 Climate and the Distribution of Life on Earth Play Video
25 Interactions with the Physical Environment Play Video
26 Population Growth: Density Effects Play Video
27 Interspecific Competition Play Video
28 Ecological Communities Play Video
29 Island Biogeography and Invasive Species Play Video
30 Energy and Matter in Ecosystems Play Video
31 Why So Many Species? The Factors Affecting Biodiversity Play Video
32 Economic Decisions for the Foraging Individual Play Video
33 Evolutionary Game Theory: Fighting and Contests Play Video
34 Mating Systems and Parental Care Play Video
35 Alternative Breeding Strategies Play Video
36 Selfishness and Altruism Play Video

Comments

Displaying 8 comments:

Charlotte wrote 8 years ago.
Thankyou very much for posting these lectures. I am studying
evolution at uni, and I find it quite interesting. This is
very informative. Thanks again!!


Charlotte wrote 8 years ago.
Thankyou very much for posting these lectures. I am studying
evolution at uni, and I find it quite interesting. This is
very informative. Thanks again!!


Charlotte wrote 8 years ago.
Thankyou very much for posting these lectures. I am studying
evolution at uni, and I find it quite interesting. This is
very informative. Thanks again!!


spacechampion wrote 9 years ago.
The numbers quoted above seem to have a copy mutation from
what the professor said to what is posted. The number of
possible zygotes is not 315000 to 350000. Those are suppose
to be 3^15000 to 3^50,000 -- [3 to the power of 15000 or
50000.]

Similarly the number 10131 should be 10^131.


spacechampion wrote 9 years ago.
The numbers quoted above seem to have a copy mutation from
what the professor said to what is posted. The number of
possible zygotes is not 315000 to 350000. Those are suppose
to be 3^15000 to 3^50,000 -- [3 to the power of 15000 or
50000.]

Similarly the number 10131 should be 10^131.


Steve Stewart-Williams wrote 10 years ago.
Cool - very interesting

rogi ashrafi wrote 10 years ago.
hi
it was great but i could not still find the answer for my
question:what kind of selection pressure can evolve
reaction norm?
thanks


Divyam wrote 10 years ago.
hai, i m stu. of B.Sc nd i find these lecture really
excellent.......


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