Programming Abstractions

Course Description

This course (CS 106B) is the successor to CS 106A and covers more advanced programming topics such as recursion, algorithmic analysis, and data abstraction. It is taught using the C++ programming language, which is similar to both C and Java. In the past when both CS 106A and CS106B were taught in C/C++, the coupling between the two classes was very tight and it was unheard for students to take CS106B without having completed our CS 106A (we recommended CS 106X instead). Nowadays, some students do go straight into CS106B, this is typically appropriate for a student who done well in an intro programming course (e.g., scored 4 or 5 on the CS AP exam or earned a good grade in a college course) and has sufficient familiarity with good programming style and software engineering issues (at the level of CS 106A) to use this understanding as a foundation on which to tackle advanced topics.

Programming Abstractions
Snapshot of lecture 21: "Linked Link Instertion and Deletion"
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Comments

Displaying 2 comments:

abi wrote 10 years ago.
she is teaching but is is somewhat fast.....i think
so.anyway she is emplaining all the concepts very well.i
like this lecture so much.thank to stanford univ


innocent_n wrote 10 years ago.
Hi Julie, very helpful list of tutorials, i trying to get a
better understanding of the sequential containers and you
did a great job of elucidating this, cheers


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