Synchronized Swimming Lessons

Video Lectures

Displaying all 14 video lectures.
Lecture 1
Stretches for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Stretches for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches some stretches for your arms and legs to prepare for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Okay, we are going to start by stretching. We really want to stretch out the arms to make sure we're not hurting ourselves while we are swimming during the warm-up. So we'll take the first right arm across, this is my left arm, but that's okay. Take the right arm across and you want to hold it about ten seconds. Shake it out. You want your hand just above the elbow so you get a nice good stretch just above the armpit, about ten seconds, and relax. Take the arm behind the head, nice and easy elbows bent, and get a nice good stretch. Hold it there for about ten seconds. Shake it out. You want to repeat the same thing on the other side, grabbing just above the elbow, and hold it for about ten seconds, and relax. And we also want to stretch out the quads, heal to your butt, oh boy, and you want to hold it about ten seconds, and relax, and the same thing on the other side, trying to stay nice and balanced holding it about ten seconds and shaking it out and last thing we want to stretch out the hamstrings. So we'll take the right foot over left, reach arms up and stretch it over. You want to hold it there about ten seconds. Come up and shake it out and the same thing on the other side. Left over right, arms up and stretch it over about ten seconds and shake it out and we are ready to get in and warm-up."

Lecture 2
Synchronized Swimming Warm Up Exercises
Play Video
Synchronized Swimming Warm Up Exercises


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches some warm up exercises in the water to prepare for synchronized swimming .



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Okay, next we are going to warm up in the water. We are going to practice the free-style stroke, the breaststroke, and the backstroke. These are all three strokes that are going to help us relax and get ready to perform our synchronized swimming movements. Free-style is also known as the front crawl stroke. It's stroke that is on your stomach, your arms are pulling you forward. You're using your arms to pull your body forward with the crawl stroke and you need to make sure to kick your feet. Also, turning your head to breathe is very important so that you can continue to breathe as long as you need to. Next, the breaststroke is considered more of a resting stroke, to allow you to stretch out and glide. You're going to use a frog kick. There's three pieces to that, you bring your legs up to like a butterfly position, then, you'll spread them out to like a V position, you'll squeeze them together to glide forward. Also, your arms are going to pull you forward with a circular motion. You are going to circle them around to lift your face out of the water. You stretch your arms back out when you squeeze your legs together. Put your face down to glide. Next, we'll be moving on to the backstroke. This one takes place, your face is out of the water the whole time. Your arms are always opposite, one arm is up, one arm is down, a nice long reach. You want them to move at the same time, while keeping your hips up and continuing to flutter kick your feet on your back. The more you reach the easier the stroke will be. Okay, everybody ready, goggles on. Let's warm up."

Lecture 3
Basic Strokes for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Basic Strokes for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches the basic strokes for synchronized swimming.

Lecture 4
Breathing Exercises for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Breathing Exercises for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches some breathing exercises like lung busters or underwaters to increase breath control for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Next up, we are going to discuss underwater, also known as lung busters. Synchronized swimmers do have to hold their breath for long periods of time while swimming these routines. So, it's important that we practice these types of laps. In order to swim under water you want to make sure that you do not blow out a lot of bubbles. You also want to stay as relaxed as possible. Try to keep an even tempo not swimming too fast, not swimming too slow and using the modified breaststroke. We want to make sure we swim with a swim clip on to minimize those amounts of bubbles that we are blowing out while going from one end of the pool to the other. During that modified breaststroke you want to make sure that you take that same breaststroke kick that we saw earlier up, out, and together, but this time you want to stretch your arms up and pull them all the way down and glide as long as you possibly can to save as much energy as you can. So, here we go."

Lecture 5
Egg Beater Kick for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Egg Beater Kick for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches the egg beater kick technique for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Synchronized swimmers perform a lot of their arm movements without standing on the bottom by using what's called the eggbeater kick. You're making circles with your legs in order to keep their face out of the water without standing on the bottom. In order to practice this skill it's good to start on the edge of the pool. You separate your legs as much as you can, flex your feet; knees are up as high as they can possibly be. You want to start by kicking your right foot out to the side, circling it around, putting it back on the wall. Take your left foot, kick it out to the side, circle it around, put it back on the wall. You want to do this about a hundred times a day, a hundred circles on each leg so your legs get comfortable so eventually they pass right by each other without stopping. Right, left, right, left, right, left. These same skills can be performed with your back against the wall, elbows up, knees up high, flex your feet, right foot, left foot, right, left, right, left, right, left. Until you get comfortable enough to practice it off the wall. So now that we have practiced on the wall, we're off the bottom, knees are wide up to the surface as high as you can get them. Presentation is everything. Not standing on the bottom you can use your arms and travel."

Lecture 6
Body Jumps for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Body Jumps for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches how to do body jumps for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Next up we are going to learn how to body jump. Just like you see water polo players jump up out of the water and block the ball. Synchronized swimmers do a lot of body jumps. It's a thrusting motion to show various arm movements and you can work different facial expressions with it but it is a good aerobic workout as well to do body jump laps. In order to begin this technique we can start on the wall. The eggbeater kicking that we learned before is very necessary for this. You want your legs to be behind you, eggbeater kicking, your shoulders are forward and your hips as high to the surface as possible. You would circle your legs around while holding on to the wall, count to three, pull up on the wall, squeeze your legs together, thrust your body up straight."

Lecture 7
Back Layout Sculls for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Back Layout Sculls for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches the back layout scull technique for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "My favorite part about synchronized swimming is the figures. Before we learn how to do the figures, we need to learn how to do the basic skills to keep our body above the water, be able to use our legs and hold ourselves up with just our arms. We are going to start with the standard back layout skill. Your hands are down by your side. Your face is out of the water. You'll be laying on your back. You turn your hands out, push them out, turn them in and bring them in. Out, out, in, in. This is going to help you stay afloat on your back without moving your feet. The idea is to keep your hips up, your ears back in the water, your chin lifted, and try to smile. Head is back, hips are up, toes are nice and pointed, ankles together, ears back in the water, hands are a little bit beneath the hips. Keep your hands flat towards the bottom, so you try not to travel and smile. This is the standard back layout."

Lecture 8
Torpedo Sculls for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Torpedo Sculls for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches the torpedo scull technique for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "The next scull is called the torpedo scull. It is known as a foot first scull. You'll be traveling towards your feet with your arms up over your head, doing something like a Miss America wave. Out and in, out, in. The idea is to keep your face, your hips, your feet at the surface of the water, not splashing any water and trying to smile. Here we go."

Lecture 9
Alligator Sculls for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Alligator Sculls for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches the alligator scull technique for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Next up we have to alligator scull. This scull takes place on your stomach with your face in the water. Again, your heals, your hips and the back should be as close to the surface as possible. Your traveling towards your head, so this is considered a head first scull. Your arms are nice and stretched above your head, and you?re pulling your body forward this time, as opposed to the torpedo scull where your pressing everything away, pressing the water away from you. You?re pulling your body forward. This helps you with your figures that start on your stomach and allow you to pull yourself down into the water without splashing. That's alligator sculling."

Lecture 10
Support Sculls for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Support Sculls for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches the support scull technique for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "The most important scull for a synchronized swimmer, I think, is the support scull. In order for them to stay upside down without touching the bottom and do pretty leg movements. We want the hands to be flat. They come to this triangle position. Your body becomes the base of the triangle. You want to try to keep your thumbs in, it's like your wiping the bottom of a tray. You want to keep your elbows in, nice and tight, as stationary as possible. Press out, bring them in, out and in. When your upside down and you start to feel the weight of the body your going to want to move the arms faster but you want your tempo to be nice and even. So you want to go out really fast and come in really slow, one, two, one, two, one, two, trying to keep the back straight. Hold your stomach in and you have yourself a good strong support scull. We can practice this standing in the water upright. Trying to keep your feet flat on the ground and your torso in line, one, two, one, two, trying to keep the elbows as stationary as possible, a nice even tempo, shoulders in line, back is in line. Try not to arch your back. This same motion can be carried out upside down to help hold your legs out of the water. This positioned can also be practiced on your stomach with your feet flat against the wall."

Lecture 11
Ballet Leg for Synchronized Swimming Figures
Play Video
Ballet Leg for Synchronized Swimming Figures


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches how to do the ballet leg figure for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "And now on to the figures, my favorite part. The most common figure you see in a lot of routines is a ballet leg, or a ballet composition. Your laid out on your back, one leg is vertical, one leg is horizontal, to create a ninety degree angle. You?re using the standard scull to keep your hips up. The idea is to get your thigh and your leg out of the water as high as possible, shoulders back, head back, with a big smile on your face. It's good to start practicing on a wall or if you have some stairs, head is back, hips are up. You take your leg; you draw it in along the surface. Make a ninety degree angle with your thigh, keeping as much air underneath your knee as possible, still sculling. Stretch your leg up. Bring it back down. Slide it out. And you have a ballet leg."

Lecture 12
Split Walkout for Synchronized Swimming Figures
Play Video
Split Walkout for Synchronized Swimming Figures


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches how to do the split walkout figure for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Today our first underwater figure will be the split walk out. This figure can be practiced in shallow water starting with your hands on the bottom. You are upside down in a handstand position. Your legs are together. You can separate them and stretch as far as you can. Your going to lift the front leg off the surface of the water reaches over to meet the back leg. You assume a surface arch position, bring your back to a back layout and you have your self a split walk out. Practice this several times. You can take it to the deep end using the vertical that we practiced earlier where you are upside down. Your hands are slightly out and in with a nice good arch in your back. Bring your legs over and unroll your body using a torpedo pull and you have yourself a nice split walk out in the deep end."

Lecture 13
Barracuda Thrust for Synchronized Swimming
Play Video
Barracuda Thrust for Synchronized Swimming


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches how to do the barracuda thrust figure for synchronized swimming.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Next up, we're going to practice a Barracuda Thrust. It's another figure you would do in the deep end of the pool. Your body starts off in a Pike position, your hands are reaching down towards your ankles, just like the Pike stretches that we started with, your legs are together. You're going to scull, unroll your body, press your hands up over your head, as high as you can, you're nice and long and your body's going to sink under the water in a vertical position. This is something we can start, just like I just did, in the deep end and you will take the whole thing and turn it upside down so that your legs are thrusting out of the water. Again, you start reaching over at your ankles, scull one, two, three, press them up, stay in a vertical position and you sink underwater. We are headed to the deep end to try it, let's go. That same way upside down."

Lecture 14
Hybrid Synchronized Swimming Figures
Play Video
Hybrid Synchronized Swimming Figures


In this video lesson, Synchronized Swimming Instructor, Ymajahi Brooks, teaches how to do hybrid synchronized swimming figures.



Video Transcript: "YMAJAHI BROOKS: "Now we've come to our hybrid. This is a series of elements, different positions that we can put together to create what we call one really really long figure. That part about holding your breath and staying relaxed is very necessary to complete a hybrid. So today we're going to combine a table top position with a vertical position with a split position. We're going to submerge it underwater and follow it all up by a barracuda. Ready? Here we go."