Black Holes: The Other Side of Infinity (2006)

National Science Foundation

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Documentary Description

Currently in distribution to more than 100 theaters worldwide, Black Holes: the Other Side of Infinity is one of the most successful fulldome shows ever produced. Narrated by Academy-Award nominated actor Liam Neeson, this cutting-edge production features high-resolution visualizations of cosmic phenomena, working with data generated by computer simulations, to bring the current science of black holes to the dome screen. Audiences will be dazzled with striking, immersive animations of the formation of the early universe, star birth and death, the collision of giant galaxies, and a simulated flight to a super-massive black hole lurking at the center of our own Milky Way Galaxy. The program is accompanied by an extensive Educator's Guide.

Thomas Lucas Productions in collaboration with Denver Museum of Nature & Science, NOVA and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications; supported by grants from NASA's high-energy GLAST telescope project and the National Science Foundation. 24 minutes.

See the giant-screen version at the DENVER MUSEUM OF NATURE & SCIENCE or the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. Narrated by Academy-Award nominated actor Liam Neeson.

Can you feel the pull? This cutting-edge production features high-resolution visualizations of black holes and other cosmic phenomena based on data generated by telescope observations and ultra-high end computer simulations.
Audiences will be dazzled with striking, immersive animations of the formation of the early universe, star birth and death, the collision of giant galaxies, and a simulated flight to a super-massive black hole lurking at the center of our own Milky Way Galaxy.
For more information, go to: http://www.spitzinc.com/fulldome_show...
Produced by Thomas Lucas Productions, Inc. in collaboration with Denver Museum of Nature & Science, and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois. Supported by grants from NASA's high-energy Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope project and the National Science Foundation.
Welcome to our neighborhood.
The Milky Way is just one of over a hundred billion galaxies in the universe. And our Sun -- it's just one of over a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way.
We used to think of each star like our Sun -- as a friendly beacon amid the long night of space.
Now we know better.
The universe wields violence beyond comprehension.
Forces capable of tearing space and time to shreds.
I'm Liam Neeson -- and we're going to take a trip to the dark side... straight inside a black hole.
Cape Canaveral, Florida. Our quest to understand black holes is about to enter a whole new dimension.
Tucked into the nose of a rocket is a telescope called "Swift."
Its mission... To hunt for perhaps the most elusive objects in the cosmos.
Black holes are so dense not even light can escape their gravity.
They defy detection.
But today, hopes are riding high.
Scientists are counting on Swift to transport them to the frontiers of human knowledge...
...and beyond.
How do you find something that hides in the dark? You have to look for its tell-tale signs...
Swift's instruments are designed to record bursts of high-energy radiation... Gamma rays don't penetrate Earth's atmosphere. But out here in space, Swift's view of them is front row, center.
They erupt when a black hole is born. That happens when a large star dies in a blaze of glory -- called a "supernova."
It's an explosion so powerful, it's as bright as a billion billion Suns.
What triggers that chain of events is the force that rules the cosmos: gravity.
Scientists used to think of gravity as some kind of mysterious power that objects, like the Sun, project across space.
But what if it's space itself that gives gravity its pull?
That's the way one man saw it...
To Albert Einstein, space is a bendable, four-dimensional fabric he called "space-time."
And gravity? That's the warping of the fabric by massive bodies.
They literally put a dent in space-time. Objects get caught in their groove -- and simply drop into orbit.

Source: http://www.spitzinc.com/fulldome_shows/show_blackholes/index...

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