Jerusalem (1999)

Lost Treasures of the Ancient World

JERUSALEM, Roman siege and destruction (David Roberts, 1850). Some archaeologists believe the city was founded by West Semitic people around 2600 BCE. Jewish tradition reports the foundation by ancestors of Abraham. The city was in land allocated to the tribe of Benjamin but continued under control of the Jebusites until the conquest by David. Recent excavations of large stone structure are interpreted by some archaeologists as lending credence to the biblical narrative.
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Documentary Description


This series Lost Treasures of the Ancient World contain authoritative and entertaining programs about the ancient world and the legacy it leave us today. Featuring ground-breaking computer graphics and animation, you can see how the historical sites looked in their heyday, and compare how they are now with spectacular new footage from Europe and North Africa. The programs also feature expert analyses by the world’s leading authorities and historians



Think of Ancient Egypt and you think of the great Pyramids at Giza - but these incredible structures are not the only treasures left to us by a truly remarkable civilization. The series visits, explores and restores such wonders as the Temples at Al Karnak and Luxor, the Temple at Abu Simnel and the Mortuary Temple of Hatsepsut. Featuring new location footage, stylish period reconstructions, ground-breaking 3D graphics, and animation sequences. With interpretations and analyses by the world’s leading authorities including Dr. Dominic Monserrat of Warwick University, Professor John Baines of the Oriental Faculty, Oxford, Peter Clayton, Egyptologist, and Professor G.A. Gaballa, Cairo University. Examine the spectacular wonders of Carthage, the ancient city which stood on the northern coast of Africa, near modern day Tunis. This Lost Treasures program allows us a unique glimpse of the ‘new city’, including the mighty walled fortress of Byrsa, which overlooked Carthage’s splendid twin harbors. Featuring new location footage, stylish period reconstructions, ground-breaking 3D graphics, and animation sequences. With interpretations and analyses by Dr. Chris Pelling of University College, Oxford, Nicholas Purcell of St John’s College, Oxford, Henry Hurst of Churchill College, Cambridge, and Professor T. Weiderman of Nottingham University. See the story of the Holy City, and the dominant building, the Temple, which once contained the Ark of the Covenant. Lost Treasures visits the sacred city exploring its famous walls and gates, and the mysterious temple under which so many secrets may be buried. Featuring new location footage, stylish period reconstructions, ground-breaking 3D graphics, and animation sequences. With interpretations and analyses by Richard Andrews, explorer and archaeologist, Dr. David Jacobson of the Palestine Exploration Fund, London, and Professor Martin Goodman of the Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. Seven Wonders of the Ancient World presents the stories of the works of architecture regarded by the Greeks and Romans as the most extraordinary structures of antiquity: the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, The Statute Of Zeus, the Temple of Artemis, the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus, the Colossus of Rhodes, the Pharos of Alexandria and the Pyramids of Egypt. Interpretations and analyses by Professor Bent Smith and Dr. Jim Coulton of the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, Dr. John Bennet of the Institute of Archaeology, Oxford, Dr. Chris Pelling of University College, Oxford, Dr. Augusta MacMahon of Cambridge University and Professor D.J. Wiseman of University College London. Romans in North Africa: Within easy reach of Rome, the rich and fertile territories of Northern Africa would inevitably become part of the huge Roman Empire. We visit what remains of the major Roman dwellings in the North African region, with exciting new footage of Carthage, the unique underground city of Bulla Regia, the impressive site of Dougga, the imposing Colosseum of El Jem, the recently discovered Chimtou, and rare images of Lepcis Magna in Libya. Featuring new location footage, stylish period reconstructions, ground breaking 3D graphics and animation sequences. Interpretations and analyses by the world’s leading authorities including Henry Hurst of St. John’s College, Oxford, Professor Roger Wilson of Nottingham University, Professor David Mattingley of Leicester University and Dr. Andrew Wilson of Magdalen College, Oxford. It is a sad fact that many Grecian achievements were destroyed by those who subsequently conquered the land: however, those that survive are a testimony to Greek skills and ideals.



Lost Treasures takes the viewer on an incredible journey to witness the breathtaking beauty of the Acropolis and The Parthenon - now and as they once were - and the majesty of the remains at Delphi, includingthe inspiring temple of Zeus. Featuring new location footage, stylish period reconstructions, ground-breaking 3D graphics, and animation sequences. With interpretations and analyses by the world’s leading authorities including Dr. John Bennet of the Institute of Archaeology, Oxford and Dr. Chris Pelling of University College, Oxford.

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