The Death of Yugoslavia (1995)

BBC Four

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Date Added: 9 years ago.

Documentary Description

History of the political events and the wars which broke the former state of Yugoslavia into several nations and caused an international political and humanitarian crisis. Using interviews with all the major participants and archive footage of the events, the series impressively performed the double feat of making understandable something which had appeared intractable and of producing 'immediate' history. Re-edited with a new ending in 1999. There is a very good book of the same name accompanying the series with yet more detail. The Death of Yugoslavia archive, 1941,1985-1996, consists of interview transcripts, videotapes, transmission scripts, files, press cuttings and published material concerning the disintegration of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) during 1987-1994. It includes VHS videos of episodes 1-5 of the documentary Death of Yugoslavia, and transcripts of eighty-seven interviews, mostly uncut (though questions are sometimes omitted), with eyewitnesses the Republics of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (containing only the Republics of Serbia and Montenegro), who describe their experiences of the rise of nationalism, constitutional developments, civil war and ethnic conflict, and members of the international community, involved in the search for a solution.
Interviewees include government and military personnel from the highest levels of the SFRY, and officials of the European Community and the United Nations, such as Slobodan Milosevic, Chairman of Central Committee of the Serbian League of Communist, 1986-1989, President of the Socialist Party of Serbia (SPS), 1990, President of Serbia, 1989-1992, President of Republic of Serbia, 1992-1997; Dr Mirjana Markovic, Belgrade university professor, Founder of Yugoslav United Left (JUL) and wife of Slobodan Milosevic; Alija Izetbegovic, Bosnian Muslim, founding leader of Party for Democratic Action (SDA), and President of Bosnia Herzegovina, 1990-1998; Radovan Karadzic, Bosnian Serb leader, head of Serbian Democratic Party (SDS) from 1990 Milan Babic, leader of Krajina Serbs; Mile-Jastreb Dedakovic, Croatian commander of Vukovar; Gen Milutin Kukanjac, Commander Yugoslav Peoples' Army (JNA) Second Army District based in Sarajevo, 1992; Sefer Halilovic, First Commander of the Bosnian Army; Gen Petar Gracanin, Yugoslav Peoples' Army (JNA), Serbian President, 1988-1989, Yugoslav Federal Interior Minister [1990]; Borislav Jovic, Serbian representative to Yugoslavia and, President of the Yugoslav Federal Presidency, 1990-1991; Milan Kucan, Slovene Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party, 1986-1990, and Slovene President from 1990; Dobrica Cosic, Serb nationalist writer, President of Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, 1992-1993; Azem Vllasi, ethnic Albanian Party leader in Kosovo; Ivan Stambolic, Serbian President 1985-1986; Franjo Tudjman, first elected President of Croatia, 1990-1999 and founder of the Croatian Democratic Union (HDZ); Gianni De Michelis, Italian Foreign Minister, 1989-1992; Maj Gen Lewis MacKenzie, Canadian United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR) Chief of Staff, Sarajevo, 1992; Larry Hollingsworth, United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) Officer in Bosnia; Lt Gen Sir (Hugh) Michael Rose, British Commander of United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR), Bosnia, 1994-1995; Sir David Hannay, British Ambassador to the United Nations (UN), 1990-1995; Hans Dietrich Genscher, German Foreign Minister 1982-1992; Peter Galbraith, US Ambassador to Croatia, 1993-1998; Rt Hon Peter Alexander Rupert Carington, 6th Baron Carrington (Lord Carrington); Chairman of the European Community conference on Yugoslavia, 1991-1992; and Rt Hon David Anthony Llewellyn Owen, Baron Owen of the City of Plymouth (Lord Owen), European Community (EC) mediator and co-chairman of the EC Conference on former Yugoslavia, 1992-1995.
Source: King's College

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