Topics: Mythological Archetypes

Mythological archetypes


An archetype is an original model of a person, ideal example, or a prototype after which others are copied, patterned, or emulated; a symbol universally recognized by all. In psychology, an archetype is a model of a person, personality, or behavior.



In the analysis of personality, the term archetype is often broadly used to refer to



1. a stereotype—personality type observed multiple times, especially an oversimplification of such a type; or

2. an epitome—personality type exemplified, especially the "greatest" such example.

3. a literary term to express details.



Archetype refers to a generic version of a personality. In this sense "mother figure" may be considered an archetype and may be identified in various characters with otherwise distinct (non-generic) personalities.



Archetypes are likewise supposed to have been present in folklore and literature for thousands of years, including prehistoric artwork. The use of archetypes to illuminate personality and literature was advanced by Carl Jung early in the 20th century, who suggested the existence of universal contentless forms that channel experiences and emotions, resulting in recognisable and typical patterns of behaviour with certain probable outcomes. Archetypes are cited as important to both ancient mythology and modern narratives, as argued by Joseph Campbell in works such as The Hero With a Thousand Faces.



Etymology



The word archetype appeared in European texts as early as 1545.[1] It derives from the Latin noun archetypum from the Greek noun á¼

Mythological archetypes