Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby (Part I) 
Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby (Part I)
by Yale / Wai Chee Dimock
Video Lecture 4 of 25
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Date Added: June 28, 2012

Lecture Description

Professor Wai Chee Dimock begins her discussion of The Great Gatsby by highlighting Fitzgerald’s experimental counter-realism, a quality that his editor Maxwell Perkins referred to as “vagueness.” She argues that his counter-realism comes from his animation of inanimate objects, giving human dimensions of motion and emotion to things as varied as lawns, ashes, juicers, telephones, and automobiles.  She concludes with a short meditation on race in The Great Gatsby and encourages a closer reading of the novel’s instances of racial differentiation.

Course Index

Course Description

This course examines major works by Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, exploring their interconnections on three analytic scales: the macro history of the United States and the world; the formal and stylistic innovations of modernism; and the small details of sensory input and psychic life.

 

 

Warning: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

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