Forex Trading - Characteristics of the Main Currencies 
Forex Trading - Characteristics of the Main Currencies
by InformedTrades
Video Lecture 8 of 61
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Date Added: May 7, 2017

Lecture Description

Practice currency trading with a free demo account: bit.ly/IT-forex-demo3

View full lesson: www.informedtrades.com/21156-forex-trading-overview-worlds-main-currencies.html

Over 80% of all currency transactions involve the US Dollar. As you can probably imagine after hearing this, currency traders pay heavy attention to what is happening with the US Economy, as this has a very direct affect not only on the US Dollar but on every other currency in the world as well.


Japan, which is the second largest individual economy in the world, has the third most actively traded currency, the Japanese Yen. After experiencing impressive growth in the 60's, 70's and early 80's Japan's economy began to stagnate in the late 1980's and has yet to fully recover. To try and stimulate economic growth, the central bank of Japan has kept interest rates close to zero making the Japanese Yen the funding currency for many carry trades, something which we will learn more about in later lessons. It is also important to understand at this stage that Japan is a country with few natural energy resources and an export oriented economy, so it relies heavily on energy imports and international trade. This makes the economy and currency especially susceptible to moves in the price of oil, and rising or slowing growth in the major economies in which it trades with.

While the United Kingdom is a member of the European Union it was one of the three countries that opted out of joining the European Monetary Union which is made up of the 12 countries that did adopt the Euro. The UK's currency is known as the Pound Sterling and is a well respected currency of the world because of the Central Bank's reputation for sound monetary policy.

Next in line is Switzerland's currency the Swiss franc. While Switzerland is not one of the major economies of the world, the country is known for its sound banking system and Swiss bank accounts, which are basically famous for banking confidentiality. This, combined with the country's history of remaining neutral in times of war, makes the Swiss Franc a safe haven currency, or one which attracts capital flows during times of uncertainty.

When traded against the US Dollar, the Euro, Yen, Pound, and Swiss Franc make up known as the "major currency pairs" which we will learn more about in coming lessons.

For the purposes of this course we will focus on currencies that trade actively 24 hours a day allowing the trader to move in and out of positions during the trading week at anytime as he or she pleases. Although not considered part of the major currencies there are three other currencies in addition to the ones just listed which trade actively 24 hours a day and which we will be covering in this course. Known as the commodity currencies because of the fact that they are natural resource rich countries, the Australian Dollar, New Zealand Dollar and the Canadian Dollar are the three final currency pairs we will be covering.

Also known as "The Aussie" the Australian Dollar is heavily dependant upon the price of gold as the Australian economy is the world's 3rd largest producer of gold. As of this lesson interest rates in Australia are also among the highest in the Industrialized world creating significant demand for Australian Dollars from speculators looking to profit from the high yield the currency and other Australian Dollar denominated assets offer.

Like the Australian Dollar the New Zealand Dollar which is also known as "The Kiwi" is heavily dependant on commodity prices, with commodities representing over 40% of the countries total exports. The economy is also heavily dependant on Australia who is its largest trading partner. Like Australia, as of this lesson New Zealand also has one of the highest interest rates in the industrialized world, creating significant demand from speculators in this case as well.

Last but not least is the Canadian Dollar or otherwise affectionately known as "The Loony". Like its commodity currency brothers, the Canadian Economy, and therefore the currency, is also heavily linked to what happens with commodity prices. Canada is the 5th largest producer of gold and while only the 14th largest producer of oil, unbeknownst to most; it is also the largest foreign supplier of oil to the United States.

Course Index

  1. An Overview of the Forex Market
  2. The Difference Between Over the Counter (OTC) and Exchange-Based Markets
  3. Who Really Controls the Forex Market?
  4. The Role of the Retail Forex Broker
  5. How Central Banks Move the Forex Market
  6. How Banks, Hedge Funds, and Corporations Move Currencies
  7. A Breakdown of the Forex Trading Day
  8. Forex Trading - Characteristics of the Main Currencies
  9. Setting Up Your Forex Trading Software
  10. Forex Trading - How to Read a Currency Quote
  11. Forex Trading - Understanding Currency Rate Movements
  12. Forex Trading - Understanding the Bid/Ask Spread
  13. How to Place Your First Forex Trade
  14. How to Determine Your Position Size in the Forex Market
  15. Forex Trading - Pips and Fractional Pip Pricing
  16. How to Calculate Forex Trading Profits and Losses
  17. An Introduction to Leverage in Trading
  18. How Trading on Margin Works
  19. How to Calculate Leverage in the Forex Market
  20. How to Calculate Leverage in the Forex Market Part 2
  21. How to Place a Market Order in the Forex Market
  22. How to Place a Stop Loss and Take Profit Order in Forex
  23. How to Place A Pending Entry Order in the Forex Market
  24. How Rollover Works in Forex Trading
  25. How Rollover Works in Forex Trading Part 2
  26. Free Forex Charts Userguide
  27. What Moves the Forex Market? - Trade Flows
  28. How Capital Flows Move the Forex Market
  29. The Current Account: How Forex Traders Can Use it to Identify Opportunities
  30. Interpreting the Capital Account and Measuring Capital Flows
  31. Fundamentals that Move Currencies - Balance of Payments
  32. How Interest Rates Move the Forex Market Part 1
  33. How Interest Rates Move the Forex Market Part 2
  34. How To Trade the Carry Trade Strategy Part 1
  35. How To Trade the Carry Trade Strategy Part 2
  36. How To Trade the Carry Trade Strategy Part 3
  37. Fundamental Analysis Vs. Technical Analysis in Forex
  38. Forex Trading Fundamentals Quiz - Test Your Knowledge
  39. Why the US Dollar is Still King
  40. Determining the Fate of the US Dollar
  41. Determining the Fate of the US Dollar Part II
  42. Determining the Fate of the US Dollar, Part III
  43. Economic Releases that Move the US Dollar
  44. A Trader's Introduction to the Euro
  45. A Trader's Introduction to the Euro, Part II
  46. A Trader's Introduction to the Euro, Part III
  47. A Trader's Introduction to the Yen
  48. A Trader's Introduction to the Yen, Part II
  49. A Trader's Introduction to the Japanese Yen, Part III
  50. A Trader's Introduction to the British Pound
  51. A Trader's Introduction to the Swiss Franc
  52. A Trader's Introduction to the Canadian Dollar
  53. A Trader's Introduction to the Australian Dollar
  54. A Trader's Introduction to the New Zealand Dollar
  55. Why Choosing a Forex Broker is so Confusing
  56. Choosing a Forex Broker: Regulation and Financial Stability
  57. Choosing a Forex Broker Part III: Transaction Costs
  58. Choosing a Forex Broker, Part IV: Technology & Add-ons
  59. Choosing a Forex Broker: Evaluating Customer Service
  60. An Introduction to Forex Capital Markets (FXCM)
  61. An Introduction to DailyFX Plus

Course Description

This 61-video series is an introduction and in-depth look at the forex market, including how to place trades, the fundamentals of the forex market, profiles of the main currency pairs, and factors to consider when choosing a forex broker.



This is a continuation of The Basics of Trading course by Informed Trades.

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