How to Read a Volleyball Court 
How to Read a Volleyball Court
by eHow / Addison Musser
Video Lecture 19 of 20
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Views: 1,819
Date Added: July 11, 2009

Lecture Description


In this video lesson, Volleyball Instructor, Addison Musser, teaches how to read a volleyball court. Reading a volleyball court is mainly assessing the other team for weak players, predicting what the other team does and talking to volleyball veterans for tips on how they read a volleyball court.



Video Transcript: "ADDISON MUSSER: "Hey name is Addison from Captain Bill's, and I'm going to teach you how to read a volleyball court. First main part in reading a volleyball court is strategy. You want to look at your opponent and see if you have a strong or a weak player or both on the other team. So if you have a weak player you want to go to your the weak player on the other team, because it will be a easier opportunity for your team to get the point. Second part on how to read a volleyball court is predicting what the other team is going to do before they do it. You want to make sure that if the set is way off the net you know you don't need to go up and block, because they're not going to be able to hit it straight down. So you want to be able to back up and get your best defensive position that you can, because they cannot hit the ball straight down. So you want to be able to predict before the other team does it what they're going to do so that you can have the best opportunity to get the ball back and to get a point for your team. The third part on how to read a volleyball court is you want to look at the veterans of playing volleyball, and look at them and how they read a volleyball court. If you're a beginning and you're walking on to a court, you're not going to be that good at reading a volleyball court. You're going to need to learn from the veterans, see how they play, and how they read a volleyball court, and learn from them. So really reading a volleyball court comes with a lot of experience. For example, say I'm playing two on two, and the setter sets the ball really tight, and I have a blocker up. If the ball is really tight I'm not going to want to hit the ball, because I'm probably going to hit it right into the blocker and it's going to come down on my side, and the other team's going to get a point. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to want to put it over the block or around the block to keep it in the court, and to make the other team move for the ball so that they have to scramble to move for the ball and try to get the point. Also if the setters sets me a little bit off the net, and I still have a blocker, I'm not going to want to hit into the block, I'm not going to want to hit it hard. I'm going to want to take a little off speed shot to get it inside the court, and once again make the opponent work for the point. Next thing is if the setter puts up a perfect set, and I have a open court with no blocker I can swing away, and hit the ball anywhere I want in the court and to make the other team work for it. If you put it all together take from those veterans, watch experienced players play the game you can learn from them. And use all your knowledge of the game to read a volleyball court."

Course Index

Course Description


In this course, Volleyball Instructor Addison Musser gives 20 easy video lessons on How To Play Volleyball. In this video series, let a longtime volleyball player explain the game of volleyball. First, learn how a volleyball court is set up, how to keep score, as well as how to keep score, spike, block, bump and set a volleyball and how to jump serve. Next, get instructions on buying an outdoor volleyball net, dinking a volleyball, digging out a spike and pancaking a volleyball. Finally, learn about floating a serve, overhand serving, reading a volleyball court and running volleyball drills.

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