Who Really Controls the Forex Market? 
Who Really Controls the Forex Market?
by InformedTrades
Video Lecture 3 of 61
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Date Added: May 7, 2017

Lecture Description

View the entire lesson: www.informedtrades.com/20991-who-really-controls-forex-market.html

Register for a free forex demo trading account: bit.ly/IT-forex-demo3

As we discussed in our last lesson the forex market is an over the counter market meaning that there is no centralized exchange where all trades are made. Because of this, the price that someone receives when trading forex has traditionally differed depending on the size of the transaction and the sophistication of the person or entity that is making that transaction.

At the center or first level of the market is something known as the Interbank market. While technically any bank is part of the Interbank market, when an FX Trader speaks of the interbank market he or she is really talking about the 10 or so largest banks that make markets in FX. These institutions make up over 75% of the over $3 Trillion dollars in FX Traded on any given day.

There are two primary factors which separate institutions with direct interbank access from everyone else which are:

1. Access to the tightest prices. We will learn more about transaction costs in later lessons however for now simply understand that for every 1 Million in currency traded those who have direct access to the Interbank market save approximately $100 per trade or more over the next level of participants.

2. Access to the best liquidity. As with any other market there is a certain amount of liquidity or amount that can be traded at any one price. If more than what is available at the current price is traded, then the price adjusts until additional liquidity enters the market. As the forex market is over the counter, liquidity is spread out among different providers, with the banks comprising the interbank market having access to the greatest amount of liquidity and then declining levels of liquidity available at different levels moving away from the Interbank market.

In contrast to individuals who make a deposit into their account to trade, institutions trading in the interbank market trade via credit lines. In order to get a credit line from a top bank to trade foreign exchange you must be a very large and very financially stable institution, as bankruptcy would mean the firm that gave you the credit line gets stuck with your trades.

The next level of participants are the hedge funds, brokerage firms, and smaller banks who are not quite large enough to have direct access to the Interbank market. As we just discussed the difference here is that the transaction costs for the trade are a bit higher and the liquidity available is a bit lower than at the Interbank level.

The next level of participants has traditionally been corporations and smaller financial institutions who do make foreign exchange trades, but not enough to warrant the better pricing

As you can see here, traditionally as the market participant got smaller and less sophisticated the transaction costs they paid to trade became larger and the liquidity that was available to them got smaller and smaller. In a lot of cases this is still true today, as anyone who has ever exchanged currencies at the airport when traveling knows.

To give you an idea of just how large a difference there is between participants in the Interbank market and an individual trading currencies for travel, Interbank market participants pay approximately $.0001 to exchange Euros for Dollars where Individuals in the airport can pay $.05 or more. This may not seem like much of a difference but think about it this way: On $10,000 that is $1 that the Interbank participant pays and $500 that the individual pays.

The landscape for the individual trader has changed drastically since the internet has gone mainstream however, in many ways leveling the playing field and putting the individual trader along side large financial institutions in terms of access to pricing and liquidity. This will be the topic of our next lesson.

Course Index

  1. An Overview of the Forex Market
  2. The Difference Between Over the Counter (OTC) and Exchange-Based Markets
  3. Who Really Controls the Forex Market?
  4. The Role of the Retail Forex Broker
  5. How Central Banks Move the Forex Market
  6. How Banks, Hedge Funds, and Corporations Move Currencies
  7. A Breakdown of the Forex Trading Day
  8. Forex Trading - Characteristics of the Main Currencies
  9. Setting Up Your Forex Trading Software
  10. Forex Trading - How to Read a Currency Quote
  11. Forex Trading - Understanding Currency Rate Movements
  12. Forex Trading - Understanding the Bid/Ask Spread
  13. How to Place Your First Forex Trade
  14. How to Determine Your Position Size in the Forex Market
  15. Forex Trading - Pips and Fractional Pip Pricing
  16. How to Calculate Forex Trading Profits and Losses
  17. An Introduction to Leverage in Trading
  18. How Trading on Margin Works
  19. How to Calculate Leverage in the Forex Market
  20. How to Calculate Leverage in the Forex Market Part 2
  21. How to Place a Market Order in the Forex Market
  22. How to Place a Stop Loss and Take Profit Order in Forex
  23. How to Place A Pending Entry Order in the Forex Market
  24. How Rollover Works in Forex Trading
  25. How Rollover Works in Forex Trading Part 2
  26. Free Forex Charts Userguide
  27. What Moves the Forex Market? - Trade Flows
  28. How Capital Flows Move the Forex Market
  29. The Current Account: How Forex Traders Can Use it to Identify Opportunities
  30. Interpreting the Capital Account and Measuring Capital Flows
  31. Fundamentals that Move Currencies - Balance of Payments
  32. How Interest Rates Move the Forex Market Part 1
  33. How Interest Rates Move the Forex Market Part 2
  34. How To Trade the Carry Trade Strategy Part 1
  35. How To Trade the Carry Trade Strategy Part 2
  36. How To Trade the Carry Trade Strategy Part 3
  37. Fundamental Analysis Vs. Technical Analysis in Forex
  38. Forex Trading Fundamentals Quiz - Test Your Knowledge
  39. Why the US Dollar is Still King
  40. Determining the Fate of the US Dollar
  41. Determining the Fate of the US Dollar Part II
  42. Determining the Fate of the US Dollar, Part III
  43. Economic Releases that Move the US Dollar
  44. A Trader's Introduction to the Euro
  45. A Trader's Introduction to the Euro, Part II
  46. A Trader's Introduction to the Euro, Part III
  47. A Trader's Introduction to the Yen
  48. A Trader's Introduction to the Yen, Part II
  49. A Trader's Introduction to the Japanese Yen, Part III
  50. A Trader's Introduction to the British Pound
  51. A Trader's Introduction to the Swiss Franc
  52. A Trader's Introduction to the Canadian Dollar
  53. A Trader's Introduction to the Australian Dollar
  54. A Trader's Introduction to the New Zealand Dollar
  55. Why Choosing a Forex Broker is so Confusing
  56. Choosing a Forex Broker: Regulation and Financial Stability
  57. Choosing a Forex Broker Part III: Transaction Costs
  58. Choosing a Forex Broker, Part IV: Technology & Add-ons
  59. Choosing a Forex Broker: Evaluating Customer Service
  60. An Introduction to Forex Capital Markets (FXCM)
  61. An Introduction to DailyFX Plus

Course Description

This 61-video series is an introduction and in-depth look at the forex market, including how to place trades, the fundamentals of the forex market, profiles of the main currency pairs, and factors to consider when choosing a forex broker.



This is a continuation of The Basics of Trading course by Informed Trades.

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